28th Oct Olympia, Dublin (Ireland)

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sunshine
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28th Oct Olympia, Dublin (Ireland)

Postby sunshine » 29 Oct 2013, 11:41

No storm will stop me now to go and get to see suede! They played: The Big Time, Barriers, Snowblind, Starts & Ends, Trash, Animal Nitrate, Filmstar, Float Away, Sabotage, Drowners, Flashboy, Dark Star, 2 of US, Another No-One, Strangers, So Young, Metal Mickey, Beautiful Ones
Encore: New Generation

Photos to follow...

sunshine
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Re: 28th Oct Olympia, Dublin (Ireland)

Postby sunshine » 29 Oct 2013, 20:37

http://www.herald.ie/entertainment/musi ... 02022.html
Tuesday 29 October 2013
Sexy Suede proving there's life in the old dog yet
REVIVAL: Old boys Suede are back with some cracking new material
George Byrne– 26 October 2013 07:00 AM
ONE of the highlights of 2012 for me had to be the return of Suede to the Olympia Theatre. Appearing over three nights, the band dedicated each night to playing one of their first three albums in sequence, before rounding out the evening with selected greatest hits and sundry tasty B-sides.
Needless to say I felt obliged to attend all three shows and each was fabulous in its own way. The evening which saw that classic 1993 eponymous debut unveiled reminded everyone just how radical and – more importantly – needed Brett Anderson, Bernard Butler, Mat Osman and Simon Gilbert were when grunge slouched the earth, giving British guitar pop back its sense of danger and sex.
The nights when Dog Man Star and Coming Up rolled out were fantastic, too, prompting memories of gigs at the Tivoli, SFX and Olympia almost two decades previously. In all this was three nights of pure pop greatness.
What the shows proved was that Suede, and Anderson in particular, have live chops to rival any act currently ploughing away on the revival circuit. No one would begrudge them a few nice paydays doing the rounds of summer festivals every couple of years or so. However, Anderson and the rest had other ideas.
Buoyed by the reaction to the 2012 shows, the band did the unthinkable and went back into the studio, emerging with Bloodsports – a collection of new material that is way ahead of their final two studio albums.
The sense of renewed energy and vigour that rubs through the collection is palpable, Anderson snarling like the dangerous dandy of old on the opening Barriers and Snowblind (a nod to the singer's, er, colourful chemical past), while the air of doomed romance permeates the great It Starts And Ends With You.
Bloodsports really is everything that a Suede fan could have wished for, tipping a nod to the past while not damaging their legacy. That they remain a truly astounding live band remains an absolute fact, too – and as for that cracking back-catalogue...
Suede play the Olympia Theatre on Monday.

sunshine
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Re: 28th Oct Olympia, Dublin (Ireland)

Postby sunshine » 30 Oct 2013, 00:09

as promised
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sunshine
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Re: 28th Oct Olympia, Dublin (Ireland)

Postby sunshine » 06 Nov 2013, 00:22

November 1, 2013
Suede at The Olympia Theatre | Review
by Stephen Byrne
http://www.goldenplec.com/suede-olympia-theatre-review/
Suede returned to The Olympia Theatre this bank holiday Monday following a two and a half-year absence from the venue since they played a three-night stint of nostalgia gigs in May 2011. Those gigs cemented the fact that Irish music fans still yearned for Brett Anderson and Co’s modern take on glam-rock. Several years later Suede return with their critically acclaimed comeback album ‘Bloodsports’ in tow and a limited edition career-spanning vinyl box-set freshly nestling on record store shelves.
Suede cut urbane figures as they emerge onstage seemingly dressed head to toe in black through the darkness save for front man Brett Anderson who strides on slightly behind the band dressed in a white shirt, instantly focusing the eye upon one of British rock’s most entrancing performers. Like David Bowie and Morrissey before him Anderson has a strident sexual mystique, an effortless cool and a heightened zeal for theatrical performance, backed up by a powerful, unique voice that’s pliable to gritty highrise glam and triumphant wise-cracking rock ‘n’ roll whilst also being palpably poignant on sorrow-clad piano ballads.
A revamped version of b-side The Big Time starts proceedings in an unexpected haze of reverberating tremolo guitar as the fan favourite is given an Americana makeover with favourable results. Anderson quickly proves himself an adroit performer moving from the standing still smokey jazz delivery of The Big Time to the energetic delivery of Barriers which harks back to Suede’s original sound. Anderson’s patented dance moves rouse the crowd as the volume swells and the band attempts to conquer the old with a trio of material from their new album. Snowblind and comeback single It Starts and Ends With You are lapped up by the crowd. Anderson doesn’t miss an opportunity to connect with the fans emphasising their importance to proceedings with vigorous hand-gestures screaming “Sing it!” for the chorus of It Starts And Ends With You.
The sing-along vibe continues through Trash with Anderson holding up his microphone to The Olympia’s boxes encouraging their occupants to sing along. The band are visibly pumped for Animal Nitrate and the crowd eagerly responds as Anderson hurls his microphone to the ground leading the crowd through his signature double-clap dance routine for the first time and he treats them to a circus act as he swings his microphone vigorously throughout Filmstar. Sabotage sees Suede plough a darker furrow with elements of ‘Disintegration’ -era The Cure audible throughout its verses before an Edge-esque riff lifts the gloom through the choruses. Brett Anderson stalks the security rail for The Drowners grasping at fans as he goes.
Not many bands could safely perform more than one b-side live but Suede do it easily with Killing Of A Flashboy - eagerly inhaled by the crowd – and follow it up with a third in the form of My Dark Star just as eagerly received with the crowd singing both word for word. A duo of piano ballads showcase the band’s versatility and Anderson’s capabilities as a vocalist as he moves from an impressive baritone to captivating high notes on The 2 Of Us. The night’s fourth and final b-side Another No One leaves The Olympia Theatre hushed as Anderson sings with only a piano for accompaniment. As the band returns so does the glam as Anderson races for the crowd once again during new single For the Strangers. So Young and Metal Mickey from Suede’s début album satisfy before Beautiful Ones sees Anderson lead the crowd though a “la la la la” sing-along before returning for a one song encore of New Generation, one of the highlights from their 1994 ‘Dog Man Star’ album.
It’s notable that none of the material from the performance was drawn from either ‘Head Music’ or ‘A New Morning’ with Suede happy to omit hits like She’s In Fashion n favour of not one but four b-sides, such is their fans’ veracious appetite for Suede’s vintage back catalogue. And no doubt if they ever decide to tour b-sides collection ‘Sci Fi Lullabies’ attendance will be mandatory for any self-respecting Suede fan. Such a bond between band and fan is a rare thing these days. It’s easy to see why Suede fans have taken ‘Bloodsports’ to heart as it contains songs that match those from the band’s past. Tonight’s performance puts Suede in contention for gig of the year such was the vitality and precision on display. Anderson, however has secured himself frontman of the year with a simply unparalleled and truly beguiling performance. With Suede in such form any chance to see them should not be missed.

sunshine
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Re: 28th Oct Olympia, Dublin (Ireland)

Postby sunshine » 12 Nov 2013, 06:32

October 27
Mat Osman of Suede | Interview
Stephen Byrne
http://www.goldenplec.com/mat-osman-suede-interview/
It would appear that 2013 will be known as the year of the comeback album with many established acts such as David Bowie and Manic Street Preachers making a return to the charts with their finest works in an age. But of all these revival records Suede’s contribution turned out to be one of the finest. ‘Bloodsports’ is a swaggering blend of the finest sonic cornerstones of their back-catalogue combined into one album, it was acclaimed by critics and fans alike and placed second in the Guardian’s ’Best Album of the Year So Far’ poll. Goldenplec caught up with Suede bassist Mat Osman as the band’s European tour rolls towards Dublin this bank-holiday Monday with new single For The Strangers and a career-spanning vinyl boxset in tow.
Following Suede’s reformation and subsequent reunion tour the band played three nights in The Olympia Theatre in May 2011, each night devoted to one of their best albums. Mat Osman is quite happy to admit that these nostalgic outings helped the band re-evaluate themselves and their back-catalogue in a way they had never done before. “For the first time we were doing these gigs where you just looked back on everything you’ve done and you just say ‘What are our twenty best songs? What are the twenty songs that could move people?’ And then when we came to write this record, we sat down and said ‘We’ve done these gigs, what is it we do well? Well let’s do that.’” Osman is well aware of the delusions that success can bring to a band and believes this time around Suede are wily enough to avoid the creative pitfalls. “You get into a strange mindset when you’re in a successful band and you wanna do things that you’re not good at and I think this is the first record where we said let’s do something we’re good at.”
However, Osman believes that Suede could only learn so much from playing the songs in a rehearsal room and that the major lessons and mistakes were made onstage in front of their hardest critics; their fans. “We’ve just been touring in Asia and we’ve played Everything Will Flow a lot and it’s a fucking massive anthem out there and I’ve no idea why. It starts out and you’re like what the fuck? People are throwing themselves around to it. Sometimes you just get that, something that in a certain place, at a certain time, it just pushes everyone’s buttons.”
Suede are very conscious of not falling into the trap of alienating their audience by indulging themselves. “We love to experiment with different set-lists but you can’t just do it to please yourself. There’s nothing more depressing than being onstage and not getting anything back from the crowd. It’s a circular thing you know what I mean? It’s really simple, the best gigs are the ones with the best crowd. It’s not the best amplifiers or the biggest crowd or that we’re feeling particularly tip-top that day. The best gigs are the best crowd. And we learnt from that what is it we do that works.”
Osman is quite frank about the band’s collective disappointment at how they limped out of existence following ‘A New Morning’, noting it as one of the main driving forces behind ‘Bloodsports‘. “Because ‘A New Morning’ wasn’t a very good record we spent a hell of a lot of time and a hell of a lot of effort on this one. I don’t think any of us wanted ‘A New Morning’ to be the last Suede record, it just felt wrong.” Osman is quite confident that no more material from Suede’s abandoned 2003 album sessions will see the light of day. “No it wasn’t very good unfortunately…we were totally lost.”
Osman acknowledges that Suede became addicted to the rock ‘n’ roll elixir losing perspective on reality and who they originally wanted to be along the way. “None of us have ever really done anything else apart from being in a band. You just get to the point where it just seems like this normal everyday thing. Which is so ridiculous because it’s the most surreal, privileged, exciting experience, virtually, that you can have. I think we needed some time away from it to suddenly realise what that world was like. When we started playing gigs again and writing again it was like how could I ever possibly have taken this for granted. It’s the most ridiculously beautiful thing to be doing. We just needed some time away from it to realise how fragile and how beautiful it was.”
When Suede split Osman had no idea what he wanted to do with his life. “I really, really didn’t want to be part of the music business for a bit.” Says Osman who had become disillusioned with the music industry. “Like a lot of people I thought that the music business was this incredibly money-grabbing, soulless kind of place and it took ten years working at other kinds of things to realise that all industries are like that. That’s just the world of work.”
Osman refuses to be drawn out on Brett Anderson and Bernard Butler’s lacklustre post-Suede output as The Tears, except to say “I think there was unfinished business between Brett and Bernard. I always thought if they made up they’d do something together again. It’s quite hard to get back together and recapture something you’ve had before. I thought it was going to be much easier than it was. There’s a reason it took us so long to make the record. I suddenly realised why a lot of reformed bands don’t make a new record.”
Osman is happy to note that despite popular folklore ”there is no real bad blood” between himself and former guitarist Bernard Butler. “Everything’s fine. I don’t really see him that much” says Osman who speaks frankly about the past.“We were very, very young it was our first band and we were really successful and we didn’t handle it very well.” It’s twenty years since Suede ”didn’t handle it very well” and Butler was fired during the recording of the band’s second album ‘Dog Man Star.’ It’s a bitter-sweet listen for Osman who says Suede are “totally proud of ‘Dog Man Star’” but notes that much of the album is ”forged from musical arguments. [The songs] are basically just four very English people being unable to express their emotions [to each other]. They just feel like songs to me [now], they don’t take me back to the days in the studio.”
“He was lucky because we went and toured ‘Dog Man Star’ for eighteen months” says Osman on Richard Oakes taking over the most coveted lead guitar role in Britain. “I think it was frustrating for him because he was playing someone else’s songs but it eased him into it quite nicely and then we disappeared off the map to write ‘Coming Up’.” Osman is quick to come to Butler’s replacement’s defence. “He was incredibly prolific for one so young. Basically of the first twenty songs he wrote ten of them are ‘Coming Up’, our biggest record. He’s fairly fearless when it comes to anything musical. I think he’ll happily stand up against anyone.”
Upon the release of Suede’s latest album ‘Bloodsports’ Goldenplec described it as “a collection of songs which could nestle comfortably between their eponymous début and 1996’s ‘Coming Up’ as if 1994’s ‘Dog Man Star’ never existed (thankfully, it does) such are the similarities in sound, ambience and lyrical wit.” Osman is comfortable to hear such praise.“I’m really proud of it but, I’ve been really proud of records before and they’ve got mixed responses. I don’t think we’ve ever had such a positive response [to a record]. I don’t know why that is. I think it’s partly because it’s a damn good record. I’m not really used to a lot of people not hating it. It feels slightly wrong.”
Suede’s current tour coincides with the release of new single For The Strangers “with proper b-sides and everything, it’s like the ’90s all over again” Osman laments. Suede have also released a limited edition, career-spanning, 11-disc vinyl boxset of all of their studio albums and b-sides collection ‘Sci-Fi Lullabies’ to coincide with this leg of the tour. The release was unplanned. “People were asking for it” enthuses Osman, “we’d a lot of fans asking for stuff on vinyl. ‘A New Morning’ never came out on vinyl and ‘Sci-Fi Lullabies’ had never been out on vinyl either. We were gonna reissue them anyway so we just thought we might as well do the whole shebang.”
The fact that die-hard Suede fans are most excited about hearing the b-sides collection on vinyl is a source of pride for the band. “It’s such a strange record because it was kind of put together by accident but it’s a proper studio record. In a way…it’s the subconscious of Suede I suppose. It’s the kind of songs we made when we weren’t being too thoughtful about it. It’s kind of a nice warts-and-all portrait of the band.” When pushed on how nice it is to hear his own composition Europe Is Our Playground on vinyl he scoffs “I’d say the royalties are gonna be massive… they’ll probably buy me a pint.”
But high quality b-sides resonate in Suede’s DNA and their importance cannot be underestimated to both fan and band-member alike. “The Smiths were a big influence. You always got this beautiful package when you opened their singles. You knew there would be great songs on their b-side’s and the art-work was always beautiful. I love it when a band creates this little world for you to throw yourself into and that was a definite influence on how we first started making b-sides. They were part of a little package a little world. I think it’s hard to give a shit about it now when singles don’t really exist in that way.”
The influence of The Smiths on Suede crossed into the land of wish-fulfilment when Mike Joyce of The Smiths unexpectedly responded to the band’s advertisement for a “Smithsy” drummer. “Mike’s fantastic” Says Osman, ”he came down and he auditioned for us and he was obviously fantastic. He’s a wonderful, wonderful drummer and he’s a lovely chap. He did some recording with us, some very early demos, but it was just really impractical. It would have been Mike-from-The-Smiths’ new band and I don’t think we really wanted that. He was aware that it wasn’t quite right and he bowed out but he was incredibly, incredibly helpful. When you’re a young band and we weren’t getting any attention from record companies, for someone like that to come along and say ‘I love the band I want to be part of it’ it was a real boost for us and I see him regularly. He’s doing an after-show party for us in a few days.”
“It’s fucking terrifying” says Osman in regards to being in a rhythm section with one of your idols and attempting to live up to the other half at the same time. “Every now and then he’d go Andy [Rourke, bassist with The Smiths] used to do this and it would be like fucking bollix!” But Osman’s experience playing with Joyce can’t have been that terrifying because he is currently involved in another project with his idol as part of Chaz Chance and The Prophets, a fictional glam-rock band which will feature in the upcoming TV show ‘The Records.’
“It came about really randomly because Johnny [Daukes] who is directing the TV show is an old friend of mine and he was asked me about writing some music for it because he wanted this glam thing and then we said we should put a band together to do it. I asked Mike [Joyce, The Smiths] because I thought it would be right up his street and then Johnny phoned up Phill Manzanera [Roxy Music] and said this is what we’re doing. We’ve got no money but I can’t think of anybody better to play guitar on it. A friend of a friend knew Gaz Coombs [Supergrass] and we phoned him up and said do you wanna come down.”
“It was this weirdly terrifying thing, everyone in the room was in awe of someone else” says Osman, quipping “I don’t think any of them were in awe of me. But everybody was in awe of somebody in the room. It was fantastic fun. I think we’ll do more. I think we’ll probably try and do an album for it.” And Osman would love the chance to take the project on the road. “I’d love to get fully dressed up in full ’70s glam but I don’t think Manzenera would. He’s done that already.”
Don’t worry if you can’t wait to see Chaz Chance and The Prophets in action though. You can catch Suede live at The Olympia Theatre this Monday 28th of October instead.


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