30th March - RAH - DMS 20th anniversary

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sunshine
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Re: 30th March - RAH - DMS 20th anniversary

Postby sunshine » 31 Mar 2014, 19:23

http://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/ ... ncer-Trust
Review: Suede at The Royal Albert Hall for Teenage Cancer Trust
A DECADE ago Suede, in the words of their bassist Mat Osman, were less popular than Status Quo.
By: Giles Sheldrick
March 31, 2014
It was post 2002, their fifth studio album A New Morning had been panned by fans and critics alike, they were tired, bored and bereft of ideas, so the 90s rockers called it a day. Drifting into obscurity wasn't meant to happen for one of the most culturally-important British bands of the past 25-years. Then came a random call from The Who's Roger Daltrey, patron of Teenage Cancer Trust, who said: "How about a one-off appearance, guys?" It was only ever meant to be just that. But four years ago we realised what all the fuss was about. A second coming, a re-birth, call it what you want but when Suede headlined the legendary week-long festival in 2010 something clicked. In fact it was so good a sixth album, Bloodsports, was followed by a sell-out European Tour.
So while Quo played a functional set of their greatest hits at the Hammersmith Apollo, five miles down the road Suede brought the curtain down on this year's Teenage Cancer Trust gigs at the Royal Albert Hall. Last night it was time for a little sentiment as the band played their seminal second album Dog Man Star in its entirety. For many, it's still the Holy Grail. And it just so happens to have frontman Brett Anderson's favourite song, too. The album - played in order - finished with a stunning version of Still Life, which Anderson, 46, dedicated to his late father, who used to take him to the venue as a boy.
While Dog Man Star was a rare treat, Suede's encore brought the house down. It was a trip down memory lane, a journey through the band's singular history calling on treasured B-sides, which culminated in a full-length version of Stay Together - a single first released on Valentine's Day 1994 and subsequently disowned by the band. And, as if to demonstrate past demons had been exorcised, they employed a string section and session trumpeters too. It was a tour de force that even saw the suits in the seats up on their feet.
And what a way to finish the week.
Osman said: "Teenage Cancer Trust gigs are great because they're very straightforward - that's the thing we like about everything we have done with them. They are really good at spending the money raised because they don't faff around. When the call came in it was like, 'would you like to play a gig - and can we have all the money?' There's never any complications with them."
This was the 14th year Teenage Cancer Trust has staged major-league concerts at the iconic venue which have raised £17million since 2000.
Suede's reformation for the charity in 2010 was singled out by Anderson as a highlight from 25-years playing live. He said: "It's great being involved with Teenage Cancer Trust again. It's amazing what they do. It’s a fantastic charity and we have a proud history of involvement with them. The gig we did in 2010 was possibly my favourite ever show in 25 years of playing live. The Royal Albert Hall has always been a special place. I used to go there with my dad who was a huge classical music fan. I understand why fans like Dog Man Star - I think it's a complete record, a journey you can get lost in. Is it my favourite Suede record? I don't know - I think the two either side of it are pretty good (Suede and Coming Up). But it just happens to have my favourite Suede song on it - The Wild Ones. It's a special song. I love the melody and I like the sentiment. It's bittersweet and just the right side of easy listening. Most of all, it speaks to people."
Teenage Cancer Trust is the only British charity dedicated to improving the quality of life and survival chances of those aged between 13 and 24.
The charity funds and builds specialist cancer units in NHS hospitals and provides staff, bringing young people together so they can be treated by experts in the best surroundings. There are now 27 across the UK - but five more are needed.

sunshine
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Re: 30th March - RAH - DMS 20th anniversary

Postby sunshine » 31 Mar 2014, 19:23

http://www.nme.com/news/suede/76433
March 31, 2014 12:15
Suede debut new track at 'Dog Man Star' 20th anniversary show for Teenage Cancer Trust. The band also performed their classic second album in full
Suede closed this year's Teenage Cancer Trust gig series at London's Royal Albert Hall last night (March 30), playing second album 'Dog Man Star' in full alongside a greatest hits set and one completely new track.
The band were celebrating the 20th anniversary of their 1994 album and began the event with a run through the record in tracklisted order.
Performing with an eight-piece string section, Suede opened with 'Introducing The Band' before 'We Are The Pigs'. Climbing down from the stage to interact with the crowd for the first of many times throughout the night, singer Brett Anderson led a singalong 'The Wild Ones' before moving into album tracks 'Daddy’s Speeding' and 'The Power'.
Previous single 'New Generation' and 'This Hollywood Life' provided two of the sets early highlights. Rarely-played track 'The Asphalt World' saw guitarist Richard Oakes under a spotlight to perform the track’s centerpiece guitar solo.
Anderson then addressed the crowd properly for the first time. "We've nearly come to the end of 'Dog Man Star'," he began. "It’s nice to play in the Royal Albert Hall. I used to come here with my dad when he was still alive, so I’d like to dedicate this song to him." The quintet then closed the first part of the set with album closer 'Still Life'.
Suede then briefly exited before returning to continue the set, beginning with a host of B-sides and special edition album tracks from the 'Dog Man Star' era including 'Killing of a Flash Boy', 'Whipsnade', 'My Dark Star' and 'Together'.
The band then moved onto a greatest hits finale, beginning with 'Coming Up' hits 'Filmstar' and 'Trash', with Anderson shaking the crowd's hands during the latter. Early single 'Animal Nitrate' followed, as well as 'It Starts And Ends With You' – taken from last year’s recent comeback album 'Bloodsports'.
Anderson then introduced brand new track 'I Don’t Know How To Reach You' before completing the set with recent track 'For The Strangers' and old favourites 'So Young', 'Metal Mickey' and 'Beautiful Ones', Anderson then introduced a brass section onto the stage, jokingly declaring that "We’ve come to the very end of the set; I think you’ve got your money’s worth" before ending with a celebratory 'Stay Together'.
Over the last week, the Teenage Cancer Trust’s annual series of gigs at the iconic venue has seen performances from The Cure, comedian Jason Manford and Paulo Nutini among others. The events are curated by The Who’s Roger Daltrey, with proceedings all going towards the charity.

sunshine
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Re: 30th March - RAH - DMS 20th anniversary

Postby sunshine » 31 Mar 2014, 22:28

some pics
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sunshine
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Re: 30th March - RAH - DMS 20th anniversary

Postby sunshine » 01 Apr 2014, 20:12

1 Mar
Suede at the Albert Hall, SW7
Stephen Dalton- The Times
Rated to 4 stars
Brett Anderson served up a lavish banquet of hip-swivelling, hand-clapping, microphone-twirling, booty-shaking high drama when Suede revisited their classic 1994 album Dog Man Star at this Teenage Cancer Trust benefit, followed by a further full-length set of the band’s greatest hits and misses. This show marked not only the 20th anniversary of Suede’s darkly operatic second album, but also four years since they played the same venue for the same charity, heralding their live comeback after almost a decade away.
Recorded in the teeth of acrimonious divorce from the band’s former guitarist Bernard Butler, Dog Man Star was a grandiose, turbulent, laudanum-drenched epic which deliberately went against the chirpy Britpop mood of the times. Its commercial prospects suffered accordingly, but it has since been widely recognised as Suede’s underrated masterpiece.
Played live in sequence, the album certainly held up well as a coherent body of work, from the perfumed narcotic drones of Introducing the Band to the jack-booted dystopian stomp of We Are the Pigs. Accompanied by an all-female string octet, the widescreen romantic tear-jerker The Wild Ones sounded tailor-made for the Albert Hall’s cavernous interior. The Power and New Generation boomed with defiant triumphalism, while The Asphalt World crackled and hissed with sexually charged sadism.
Whipping up hysteria with his tireless totalitarian Jagger-swagger, the strikingly lean 46-year-old Anderson made repeated forays into the crowd, who embraced him like the messianic art-rock genius he has always believed himself to be. He then introduced the voluptuous orchestral ballad Still Life, the final track on Dog Man Star, with a touching dedication to his late father.
By this point, it appeared that Suede could do no wrong. But then they did, by playing a clutch of lacklustre B-sides from the Dog Man Star era, briefly raining on their own parade. Anderson’s gang have always operated at their best in feverish melodrama mode. When they downshift into more conventional indie-rock gear, their paucity of humour and occasionally leaden traditionalism can grate.
Fortunately, they kept plenty of high-camp heavy weaponry in reserve, quickly regaining lost ground with an exhilarating Trash, a gloriously salacious Animal Nitrate and an explosively euphoric Beautiful Ones. Two decades after they were unfairly overshadowed by Britpop, Suede are enjoying a grand rebirth, playing some of their biggest and best shows ever.

sunshine
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Re: 30th March - RAH - DMS 20th anniversary

Postby sunshine » 01 Apr 2014, 21:39

http://life.royalalberthall.com/2014/03 ... arch-2014/
Teenage Cancer Trust: Suede – 30 March 2014
By Rick Burin - March 31st, 2014
Suede brought the audience to their feet on Sunday night as they returned to the Royal Albert Hall, the scene of their 2010 reunion concert, for a show marking the 20th anniversary of cult album Dog Man Star.
Accompanied by an eight-piece string section and led by flamboyant frontman Brett Anderson, the totemic ‘90s rock band played their legendary second record in full, before treating the sell-out crowd to a string of hits, rarities and new songs.
Highlights of the main set included a sing-along take on single New Generation, an extended version of The Asphalt World – with its sweeping balladry and intense fretwork – and the climactic Still Life, complete with a stunning orchestral finale that drew a standing ovation, from the Stalls to the Circle.
The band kicked off the second half with four straight B-sides, and performed a trio of rapturously received hit singles from third album Coming Up: Filmstar, Trash and Beautiful Ones, before concluding with Stay Together, joined by a three-part brass section.
Anderson has always said the Hall has a special place in his heart, having visited the venue with his father as a child, and the sense of occasion and excitement was obvious as he threw his all into songs like The 2 of Us – and wandered into the audience to be mobbed at regular junctures.
Surely the defining moment of the evening came during The Living Dead, though, in which the frontman briefly abandoned his microphone to lead the crowd in an a capella rendition: 5,000 voices singing an obscure 1994 B-side as one.

sunshine
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Re: 30th March - RAH - DMS 20th anniversary

Postby sunshine » 11 Apr 2014, 19:38

http://hootingandhowling.com/live-suede ... -30032014/
LIVE: Suede, Eagulls – Royal Albert Hall, London – 30/03/2014
By Daisy Edwards
April 8, 2014Posted in: Live
Twenty years ago, the release of ‘Dog Man Star’ was largely a big deal for Suede, having shaken arrangements by switching Butler’s guitar work for an unfathomably young and talented Richard Oakes and gathered an increasing congregation off the back of their debut a year prior, they still had quite a lot to prove. Thankfully, when the LP did hit the shelves in late ’94, it became a natural epic that swiftly cut away the doubt with a fair amount of soaring genius and soon became vastly argued as the outfit’s masterpiece. So understandably when they took to the stage of the Royal Albert Hall for the last of the Teenage Cancer Trust series last week to celebrate ’Dog Man Star’ riding high from the success of 2013′s comeback ‘Bloodsports’ and a mesmerizing warm up show the Friday prior – 4 years to the date of their unexpected comeback of the same occasion, expectations were notably high, and as the hours fell, the outfit proved themselves to be still more than capable of making their past efforts surpass the ideas of even the cult indignantly perched on the pavement from the early hours, and incredibly so.
Before Suede set to work however, came support in the form of the monstrous tones of Eagulls. The five piece swiftly took to the stage, masterfully nonplussed by the albeit diverse crowd and sound issues they faced, and tore through a handful of tracks from their recent eponymous debut with the energy of thousands.
With the set’s constraints packing the thunderous types in, latest single ‘Nerve Endings’ kickstarted the set with a wall of psychedelically twisted punk and standouts came thick and fast with tracks like ‘Tough Luck’ and ‘Footsteps‘ harnessing the sheer musical power behind frontman George Mitchell’s angsty growls and proving worthy of any moshpit in the land – though somewhat unfortunately non existent ones in this case.
Closing the set with the eruption of ‘Possessed’, the outfit established themselves as quite something live on top of the blisteringly brilliant tracks featured on the album, and might just be onto something this year.
All too soon, however, the venue was united in the raspy shouts of Sex Pistols’ ‘Bodies’ with dry ice and sharp silhouettes darting onto stage starting the haunting tones of ‘Introducing The Band’, and from the first swivel of Mat Osman’s hips, the power of the band’s 1994 epic was unleashed in full flow.
The first hour saw the outfit impressively soar through the album in it’s entirety to an intensely eager crowd – within 5 minutes and before the majesty of ’We Are The Pigs’ had reached the first chorus Brett Anderson had flung himself into the clutches of the front row and beyond evidently losing a button or two, setting the tone for the night.
Swiftly storming through ‘Heroine’ with much the same energy, made way for a soaring string-fueled rendition of ’The Wild Ones’ already stealing some of the dry eyes in the house before ‘Daddy’s Speeding’ stole the thunder completely and drew the crowd into an intense 5 minutes of soul stealing stare outs with Anderson himself and moments of euphoria led by the haunting distortion of Oakes’ guitar and the stark piano jolts of Neil Codling, conjuring up a power left unsurprisingly unmatched by ‘The Power’ itself – they try don’t they?
Thankfully, the double shot of ‘New Generation’ and ‘This Hollywood Life’, both still standing as masterful slices of guitar fueled singalong brilliance picked things back up in time for the still very much energetic crowd to burst back into life before being swept back into an impressively heartbreaking rendition of ‘The 2 Of Us’ - carried out with Anderson curled into a ball on the stage on his knees pouring out sheer emotion and a dip into ‘Black Or Blue’ to prove the high notes still can in fact be hit, and with much gusto at that.
Then, as nudges of anticipation filled the room, came ‘The Asphalt World’, the track regarded as everyone I’d spoken to’s favourite, and an unfortunately neglected one live, that was unsurprisingly one of the set’s high points, building up the cries of Anderson into an intense guitar solo of psychedelic realms and fading into oblivion, by the end it was arguably a religious experience for all involved. Lastly, after a heartfelt dedication to Anderson’s late father who “used to bring me here all the time”, came ‘Still Life’, the soaring epic finale of ‘Dog Man Star’ and when complete with strings live, a track like no other, sending the entire hall into rapturous applause by the time the crashes of Simon Gilbert kicked in and more than a few tears streaming down the faces as they fled offstage – they’ve certainly still got it, and it’s enough to give you goosebumps everytime.
However with no time at all to bask in the album’s limelight, the outfit were back onstage stamping through criminal B-side ‘Killing Of A Flashboy’ before treating the diehards to the rarely aired trio of ‘Whipsnade’, ‘My Dark Star’ and Oakes’ even more seminal than before first offering ‘Together’, all received with mild mass hysteria and arms clamouring everytime Anderson strutted by – another button gone.
‘Filmstar’ took a step back onto familiar ground, leading the way for a quick interjection of dance inducing hits with ’Trash’ - the ultimate anthem to anyone surrounding and including myself, ‘Animal Nitrate’ and latest gem ’It Starts And Ends With You’ causing the entire hall to shout along with the Brett-isms as if their lives depended on it.
Silence fell long enough for the man himself to introduce a new track by the name of ‘ I Don’t Know How To Reach You’ - a typically dark Suede-y affair with piercing guitars and a punk-esque climax of dramatic screams that raised the bar of anticipation for ‘Bloodsports’ follow up even more considerably whilst the madness was briefly juxtaposed by heartwrencher ’The Living Dead‘, incredibly sung off mic by Anderson and only accompanied by the lone Oakes’ acoustic it filled the venue with a strange sense of sombre sobriety, though one naturally short lived as the single circuit came back in full force with the ‘lighters out, chanting on’ ‘For The Strangers’ and the smashes of 1993′s ‘So Young’ and ‘Metal Mickey’ - still complete with killer hair swishing solo.
Penultimately came ‘Beautiful Ones’ - still standing as brilliantly as it did in ’96 and enough to conjure up grins on the faces of all – then a trio of sax players edged their way onstage for ‘Stay Together’ in it’s full length glory and with Anderson flinging himself into the crowd, Osman singing as enthusiastically as the rest of the room and Codling still singing higher than anyone else in the room whilst Oakes and Gilbert commanded the musicality side of things alongside the mini orchestra crammed onstage, by the final understated piano outro the entire hall was on it’s feet, the majority left awestruck and gazing questionably at each other as the outfit darted off the stage, humble nods in tow.
In 2 and a half hours, Suede managed to fit in a masterpiece album, enough b-sides to shellshock even the diehards and enough hits to keep everyone else in the loop, and if nothing else that’s a feat to be admired – but when done with the energy and utter brilliance they did, you can only be thankful they came back when they did, and stole the rightful crown of Britpop reunions once and for all.


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