Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

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Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 18:15

And the second night was even better... After Paris, we were rightly scanned as we were going in which took longer than expected... so we had to wait a bit longer... but it was worth it.

So we had:
When You Are Young, Outsiders, No Tomorrow, Pale Snow, I Don’t Know How To Reach You, What I’m Trying To Tell You, Tightrope, Learning To Be, Like Kids, I Can’t Give Her What She Wants, When You Were Young, The Fur & The Feathers

MHollywood Life, Flashboy, Trash, Animal Nitrate, We Are The Pigs, Heroine, Heroin, Strangers, Filmstar, New Generation, Breakdown, Animal Lover, So Young, Mickey, Beautiful Ones
Encores: 2 of Us, Ashphalt World, Still Life

Nice touch to the dedícate a song for the people who died in Paris.

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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 18:23

Some photos
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sunshine
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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 16 Nov 2015, 06:45

Sunday 15 Nov 2015
Rockers SUEDE delayed the start of their London show on Saturday (14Nov15) to step up security in the aftermath of the Paris terror attacks.
The Trash stars performed at London's Roundhouse venue on Friday (13Nov15) as the atrocities in the French capital unfolded, with gunmen and suicide bombers targeting numerous sites across the city. More than 120 died, including around 87 who were gunned down at an Eagles of Death Metal show.
Suede returned to the Roundhouse for a second concert on Saturday, and frontman Brett Anderson admitted the rockers came close to cancelling the gig because of the events in Paris, telling the crowd, "Seven hours ago we thought we weren't going to play."
However, they decided to go ahead with the gig after stepping up security measures - fans were asked to submit to body scans before entering the building, and the extra checks caused long delays.
Hundreds of revellers were left queuing in the rain hours after the venue's doors opened, and the issue promoted the band to push back the planned 8.15pm (local time) start.
A security guard at the venue told WENN, "Extra measures are being put in place to make sure everyone is safe... We are delaying the start of the show. We just want to make sure everyone is safe."
Suede finally took to the stage at 9pm local time, 45 minutes late, and at the end of the show, Brett dedicated the encore to the victims of the Paris attacks, declaring, "I want to dedicate this section of the gig to those who lost their lives yesterday."
http://www.new-magazine.co.uk/news/view ... -security/

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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 16 Nov 2015, 20:35


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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 16 Nov 2015, 20:37

16 November 2015
Suede, tour review: Back to the Nineties with a bang
The reformed band remain reassuringly out of step and played with a fired-up ferocity, says Andre Paine
There's been a trend in recent years for bands to perform classic albums, but playing a newly minted record in full risks alienating even devoted admirers.
Night Thoughts is not out until January, so this unveiling of Suede’s seventh album and accompanying silent film implied an unshakeable confidence.
The reformed band, who released a fine comeback two years ago, remain reassuringly out of step. With Suede semi-visible behind the film screen at the Roundhouse, the brooding guitars and haunting sequence of a drowning man during When You Are Young did not suggest a group chasing chart glory.
For fans, this preview offered a reprise of the dark grandeur of their 1994 masterpiece Dog Man Star. There was a hard, punkish edge to Richard Oakes’s riffs on No Tomorrow, while Brett Anderson’s sharp, enveloping voice sounded better than ever on Outsiders.
The staging made for an immersive experience, yet Suede still know how to write alluring, hedonistic tunes. Like Kids was such a satisfying throwback it might just as well have been called Trashy Beautiful Ones.
After the interval, Suede returned to the Nineties in earnest for a set that was remarkable for its fired-up ferocity. It ranged from the triumphant singalong of Trash and the rollercoaster riffs of Animal Nitrate, to rare appearances of beloved B-sides.
It was held together by Anderson, a motivational, flamboyant frontman who swung his microphone, flicked his fringe and dived into the crowd during sleazy debut single The Drowners. When the lithe singer emerged from the clamorous throng with his shirt unbuttoned, he looked glad to be back at the helm of one of our best bands.
Roundhouse, NW1.
http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/musi ... 15386.html

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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 16 Nov 2015, 20:38

15th November
Suede, Roundhouse, London gig review: Still ahead of the curve
Roisin O'Connor |
Beneath the circus dome of Camden’s Roundhouse, Suede frontman Brett Anderson, circus master, cracks his mic cable like a whip.
Using a gig format that feels utterly original, the entire first half of this scintillating performance debuts the band’s new album Night Thoughts, accompanied by a feature film from music photographer Roger Sargent.
Nightclubs, the man on the bed from 1994 album Dog Man Star’s cover art, a fish tank, the streets of what looks like a typically downcast Swansea; these scenes loom huge and menacing over the band and obscure them altogether as Anderson howls.
Putting the show in showmanship, he drops to his knees for Night Thoughts’ “I Don’t Know How To Reach You” in the first set, then clambers down into the audience to cling to the hands of ecstatic fans during the eternal “Beautiful Ones” and “Trash” in the second: over-the-top behaviour that would appear ridiculous from a less-experienced performer.
Reminding the crowd of just quite how many hits this band have, they bring the night to a close in cyclical fashion with three tracks from their debut album: in with the new, out with the old. After a quarter of a century, Suede are still ahead of the curve.
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 36056.html

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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 19 Nov 2015, 18:53


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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 20 Nov 2015, 06:15

19 November 2015
SUEDE "Night Thoughts" : Camden Roundhouse 13/14 November 2015
Mark Reed
They play with their hearts, as if it matters – this thing as stupid as making a racket with planks of wood and steel boxes. It changes lives, and makes worlds a better place.
For a band twenty five years in, you might expect Suede to rest on their laurels slightly. They could, so very easily, do a Pixies, and spend ten years touring off four albums, keeping it fresh by playing latter period b-sides from the dead end days of 2CD's+a DVD+a cassette single, as the memory of new music becomes a faded hope and the band become a rock museum.
Premiering their next record, live and in full, with a accompanying narrative film projected the height of the venue, is a gutsy move. But with it, Suede reinvent the album. The album is a dead concept to some, a archaic assortment of songs bundled together to be shattered into a dozen Spotify playlists. Not Suede. Presented as a whole, “Night Thoughts” isn't so much a selection of songs as a musical drama. Opening with “When You Were Young”, the seventh Suede album is a dense, and intelligent record. The type of thing bands don't tend to do anymore. Songs bleed into each other ; guitar lines and themes appear throughout multiple songs, much like a film soundtrack has it's key motifs, whilst the lyrics reach into the song around them, sharing imagery and cues. It may sound pretentious, but it's more constructed as a set of songs that work well together. Let's not use the word “concept album” because thats the kind of bullshit you get for narrative albums about oppressed workers overthrowing robot corporations made by meathead guys who have never known the touch of a human female. But the record is a interlinking, and interconnected set of songs all around the same themes, of communication, love, relationship, loss, life. Taken as a whole, it's a lot of digest, and the songs are individually rich in the way that only can reward repeated listening. I can't wait to listen to these at home, endlessly, as a unified body of work. Together, these songs sound like they could be the best singular Suede album since 1994's epic “Dog Man Star” in scope and construction, in flow, and in a cohesion where the songs stand together individually and as a narrative whole telling the story of a movement of life.
Oh, and then there's Richard on guitar, who suffers because he isn't called Bernard – otherwise he'd be lauded as the genius musician that i) he is and ii) might embarrass him to be told so. The new songs are drenched in beautiful textures and sounds that show he always played to the song and not the instrument. He's never sounded so damn good. And yes, I know how high that particular bar has been set.
Whilst there may be no single breathtaking 'pop hits' in the new stuff, this isn't the Suede that need to headline the Reading Festival of yore, but a new, relevant version of the band that seem driven by remaining relevant and having a point, a purpose, an artistic identity and here they reimagine the album ; no longer a bunch of songs piled together, but a interconnecting set of scenes designed to create a wider, larger experience : and this, coupled with a narrative film detailing a mid-life crisis and the beginning, middle, and end of a a relationship (it starts, and ends, with you, after all), create a powerful but not exactly pleasant whole.
Though, as one of my friends texted me afterwards “it's a laugh a minute.” Perhaps, more sincerely, I'm also told “That's a lot of vomiting.”
The second half of the night was a practical second Suede show in its own right – a 90 minute, 18 song precis of past glories that in itself, is longer than Suede's summer festival sets. There's a core of hits, which are, in themselves, superior to their once-peers, the disintegrated Oasis and sadly defunct Pulp, the artistically redundant Blur ; but equal to their heroes. Across the two nights, there are 25 songs, 7 each reserved for each night : night 1 opens with the rarely played stomper “Moving” that roars like a lion in ambition and hunger, alongside the gorgeous “The Living Dead” and the live premiere of recent non-album track “Darkest Days”. Night #1 closes with the debut EP in full, of “The Drowners”, “My Insatiable One” and “To The Birds”.
Second night isn't quite so fun, as dunderhead meatsacks get tanked up and drunk, then storm into the area in front of the stage, demanding we all part to please them, like some fat, drunk, sportsuited drunken Moses and we were the Red Sea whilst they wait for “Live Forever”...Red Mist, I think.
After Captain Drunk And The Thundercunt Army get bored and settle down or get ejected, there's a stormer of a show ; even better than the night before, with “Heroin” getting only it's second live performance in history, and “Breakdown” its fourth (baffingly, because its the kind of song that some bands would make whole careers out of). “Animal Lover” is next, and getting it's third live performance since 1993 ; given that no one in the band seems to like it, it's quite intruiging they are playing it. It's OK, but insubstantial, like musical Haribo. Night #2 ends with a “Dog Man Star” miniset, which, every time I see it, is still one of the greatest experiences there is, a 25 minute suite of dark, powerful drama that ends on one of the greatest funeral songs of all time, “Still Life.”
Suede have one of the best bodies of work of any band. They play with their hearts, as if it matters – this thing as stupid as making a racket with planks of wood and steel boxes. And the new songs are now, of here, of what it is to be in this planet, on this world, sucked to this ball of rock drifting through space, in this space and time. The future is promising, and only repeated exposure to the dense and challenging “Night Thoughts” will tell you if it is the future that you connect with.
http://www.thefinalword.co.uk/content/view/1338/35/

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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 20 Nov 2015, 06:17

November 19, 2015
Live Review: Suede @ The Roundhouse – 15/11/15
Daisy Edwards
As a crowd similarly recognisable to the night prior – completely undeterred by its shocking neighbouring events – occupied the Roundhouse with not an inch of space left, a cinema screen swamping the stage lit up with the French flag. Red, white and blue was thrown across the venue in a defiant haze and, almost instantly, the Saturday night of Suede‘s Night Thoughts premiere took on a role of much deeper unexpected poignancy. Drifting onstage understandably later than planned backed by industrialised noise and a scream of the album’s title, making for enough to unsettle anyone, the five piece launched into the rousing, orchestral-delving ‘When You Are Young’, masked behind the visuals of a man submerging himself into the murky depths of a British coastline, and the tone for the night was set.
As the sinking began, ‘Outsiders’, the outfit’s first single from the album, burst through a scene of the main protagonists’ entangled underwater kisses whilst spotlights were thrown on the band as the chorus erupted and the audience – word perfect – chanted along in an air of inclusivity. With the sentiment of the moment it felt like Night Thought’s closest anthemic answer to ‘Trash’, an impressive feat. Next, with an unfaltering falsetto rarely heard from any singer over 45 these days, ‘For Tomorrow’ proved itself as Suede’s potential next great hit in an apt sense of living in moment – ‘fight the sorrow/like there’s no tomorrow’. Falling to his knees with fists full of emotion at every instant, Brett Anderson proved his frontman accolades as the screen lit up to reveal the band beneath shots of the mundane everyday cafe, flashing up in a whole new light of ’90s tinged surreality.
Previously aired tracks ‘What I’m Trying To Tell You’ and ‘I Don’t Know How To Reach You’ followed suit in proving the outfit are still more than capable of writing meaningful hits, with the former taking on a stomping sense of funk visible in the unstoppable moves of bassist Mat Osman and the latter building into a tide of convulsing guitars and fiercely ardent vocals, both dealing with the onscreen appearances of despairing broken love.‘Tightrope’ however came as the standout for the senses, a sullenly dark ballad reinvented as a string driven affair with ‘on the edge’ desperation echoing in every word of Anderson’s typically twisted lyrics. Whilst drawing in the entire room with stirring visuals of a small, blonde boy tearing through fields of maize before drowning in the sea as his father watches on, it was arguably the most painful moment of a strikingly bleak film, but one where the music and film perfectly combined in the way the band and director Roger Sargent envisaged and made for more than enough of the high art kitchen sink drama it promised to be.
With the visual drama unfolding itself in disturbed routes of writhing naked bodies, frantic dancing figures and a healthy dose of red vomiting, ‘Like Kids‘, another standout gem from Night Thoughts, soundtracked. With signature riffs and Brett Anderson’s cries of ‘Oh it’s a part of us/Oh we hold it in our pretty fists/Like kids/Like savages’ echoing the carefree misfit existence of younger lives – a central theme to the audiovisual submersion, it demonstrated another attempted crowd singalong moment likely to be an admirable new shot to stand up alongside the band’s more classic hits.
Finally, as the film cut back to one final walk on the beach, an eerie reprise of the first track ‘When You Were Young’ washed over into ‘The Fur and The Feathers’ and documented the protagonist slipping back under the ocean as Anderson fell to his knees once more with a sighing reflection on ‘the thrill of the chase’, culminating the album’s intense journey.
Proving to be a visceral masterpiece for eyes and ears, Night Thoughts drew on the darkest depths of the band’s previous material and though comparisons to Dog Man Star would be too easy, the effects were far more true to life in the circumstances of the Roundhouse that night and overwhelmed the venue as the band crept offstage – but naturally, they weren’t quite finished yet.
With an hour left until curfew and a crowd left craving a dose of familiar Suede energy after the sombre sense of the LP, the band swiftly thrashed back onstage to the notes of ‘This Hollywood Life’, with the entire room visibly driven by a sudden contrast of freneticism, passion and anger at outside events, and remained that way. Taking suit with its ‘Hits & Treats’ dubbed title, barely a word was uttered as the band fell full force into a triple shock of ‘Killing Of A Flashboy’, ‘Trash’ and ‘Animal Nitrate’ and each face lit up screaming every word impassioned and united, dragging Anderson into their clutches as if their lives depended on it at any given opportunity. As a typically first two album heavy set followed, the treats came as further delights to even the most dedicated, with the appearance of 1999’s beautifully subdued Head Music B side ‘Heroin’ causing one nearby forty something man to let out an unheard of scream in sheer joy. Similarly, rarely played Suede LP snippet ‘Animal Lover’ sent the 1,700 strong crowd into the sort of unadultered frenzy that the track likely conjured up when the outfit were still playing dingy basements in 1992.
Before slipping off into an encore revealed by Brett in typically enigmatic fashion, ‘I’m going to have a heart attack, do you want some more?…These are the last ones, till we come back and play some more!’, ‘Metal Mickey’, ‘So Young’ and inevitably ‘Beautiful Ones’ unleashed the last doses of energy, with Anderson jumping into the audience to be half mauled in a sea of ‘La la la”s. It left Richard Oakes to take centre stage, commanding a wall of squealing guitar riffs – remaining as encapsulating now as they were twenty years ago – as Anderson disappeared in their wake.
Silently strolling back onstage in the aftermath of a hits assault with a crowd unsure quite what more they could do – having struck out every hit possible crammed into a mere hour, the band sidled into the epic latter half of 1994’s Dog Man Star, dedicating it to the victims of the Parisian attacks. ‘The 2 Of Us’ brought sombre tears before the intensity of ‘The Asphalt World’ and a soaring, emphatic performance of ‘Still Life’ let loose all sense of emotion in the venue. The outfit had hit their stride, softly nodded and then swept off into the night.
With two sold out nights of awe-striking musical power, Suede have proved themselves to be the only band currently that can play a brand new, unknown album from start to finish without alienating their entire audience – a feat unheard of in a world full of shuffle modes and Spotify mood playlists. On top of that they’ve devised a concept LP that neither strikes the sheer absurdity of certain 70s prog-rock crashes nor the clichéd mists of straight-form storytelling which alone deserves them all the praise they can get. Furthermore, when coupling this with a second set containing enough hits to please the more casual goers and enough rarities to leave any die-hard sat on the pavement for 12 hours prior in shock, the five piece are truly showing they are far from a nostalgia trip by this point. In their 25th year, Suede are unstoppable, and it’s far from over yet.
http://www.radsound.co.uk/live-review-suede-roundhouse/

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Re: Roundhouse 14th Nov 2015

Postby sunshine » 24 Nov 2015, 19:45

November 24, 2015
Suede Push Creative Boundaries As They Premiere ‘Night Thoughts’ In London | Live Review
Martin-john McDonnell
You wouldn’t blame Mr Anderson and co for taking a back seat as they move to the darker side of their forties with a run through the hits or a fan-pleasing album here and there. Plenty of bands from the same era as Suede have done the nostalgia run. In the last year or so alone we’ve seen Ride, Kula Shaker and Lush both reform to play concerts at the same venue that’s hosting Suede’s two night run.
While with those three it’ll all be about customary run throughs of the likes of ‘Hey Dude’, ‘Lady Killers’ and ‘Vapour Trail’, Suede have bravely placed the focus on not just their new album but the accompanying film written by Stephanie De Giorgio and directed by Libertines alumni Roger Sargent. Perhaps it’s another example of outsider thinking for the 90’s biggest cult band. Possessing a large and fiercely loyal fan base, but not really reaching past them, Suede are able to make the sort of career moves that may be suicidal to other bands who elect to stick to the safety of the reunion circuit.
The night opens with a flourish of bombastic strings, giving way to an almost biblical angular guitar riff from Richard Oakes, who seems to have found his own signature sound since the band’s 2010 reunion.
A thousand faces look up to the video screen as opener ‘When You Are Young’ sets the tone of drama and elegance that goes along with this album. It’s a composed and controlled song in many ways, but its subtleties play perfectly with singer Brett’’s falsetto tones to take command over the audience – who at this stage still haven’t actually caught a glimpse of the band who are playing to them.
However, the video doesn’t pull the audience in until second song and most recent single ‘Outsiders’. Telling its tale of forbidden love, Roger Sargent plays it perfectly by ramping up the gritty kitchen sink vibe up to the maximum. From here on in the film doesn’t let down from its gritty precipice, pushing the audience, almost prodding to find out their limits in terms of the harsh imagery placed in front of them.
Lights illuminate the band during pivotal moments that don’t just serve to remind us of the live band’s presence but often enhance the film’s drama too. Anderson plays a shadow role to the male protagonist, mirroring the drama presented on the screen.
“Fight The Sorrow” sings Brett Anderson on ‘No Tomorrow’ as viewers are treated to the sight of an elderly man attempting suicide. It’s a harrowing juxtaposition between what seems on the surface to be a melodically upbeat song and the shockingly graphic images presented in front of our eyes.
‘I Don’t Know How To Reach You’ shows the male protagonist kidnap his estranged wife at gunpoint in a violent but moving scene. It’s paired with an alternate reality where his lover is receptive to his attempt to rescue her, which makes her fear and anguish at the ordeal all the more harrowing. Musically it’s a powerful song utilizing the angular guitar of Oakes with Anderson’s high register pleading to create a dramatic song that matches the tension seen on screen.
Some comic relief, or as close as this film comes to it, is given in the clip for ‘What I’m Trying To Tell You’ as the protagonist imagines himself on stage as he apes Brett in the backyard of his estranged lover. This is the track that comes closest to the Coming Up sound. A glam like riff and an unashamedly pop chorus gives way into a la la-ing ending.
‘Tightrope’ flashes back to the happier times of our poor protagonist, finding out his girlfriend has fallen pregnant and the joys of bonding with his young song. ‘Tightrope’ is this album’s ‘Wild Ones’ moment, with its poignant lyrics and unashamedly balladeering performance.
‘Like Kids’ gives a shout out to the bands critical peak, Dog Man Star with the protagonist passed out naked on a bed in a scene that mirrors the cover of that immortal album. “Do I want you because you’re out of reach” asks Brett as the man above us suffers a drug-fuelled break down as revellers view him with curiosity while simultaneously vomiting their guts up themselves. Glam to the extreme, this is a good shout for the second single. It’s definitely got the radio appeal while staying true to the extreme dramatist of the rest of Night Thoughts. In perhaps another DMS shoutout, the track ends with a children’s chant reminiscent of ‘We Are The Pigs’.
‘I Can’t Give Her What She Wants’ is the showpiece vocal for Brett Anderson. He soars above the low-key backing to give a commanding performance that belies the near 50 years of its vocalist.
The film’s plot eventually rounds off as we see the protagonist’s young son drown at sea, explaining the chain of events that have pulled in not just himself but all those around him – the grandfather’s suicide, the mother’s affair, the father’s mental collapse. It’s an amazing pay off to a film that before this pivotal point ran the constant risk of being brave but disjointed.
As the gorgeous ‘The Fur And The Feathers’ brings the first half of the set, and the album, to a close, it’s clear that this is a new creative high point for the band. While this may not have the mass appeal of the band’s earlier work, it represents Suede as a forward thinking and creatively fluid act who aren’t content to rest on the laurels of the successful comeback of Bloodsports.
All in all, Night Thoughts is an epic, dramatic and at times challenging album that surprisingly seems to work best with its counterpart album.
The band’s second set sees Suede back in their audience thrilling pomp. Brett leaps around the stage to the likes of ‘Animal Nitrate’ and ‘Trash’ like a man thirty years younger than his real age. The audience surges with a youthful energy as well, even though as soon as the concert ends many of them will be likely phoning childminders to check on their beloved.
There is an odd disjoint between the two sets. The film is hard to see standing at floor level and really requires you to be seated at balcony level for the full cinematic experience, while the band’s second set of sleazy anthems will make you want to dive off said balcony to get right in amongst the action. But for such a brave move by the band, you can forgive this small trade-off.
Lesser aired tracks like A New Morning era rarity ‘Heroine’ and ‘Animal Lover’ are both offered to the die-hards as tokens of appreciation for their unwavering support of the new offerings of set one. The fans pay back that loyalty by rapidly pogoing to every last note of the set and ravishing Brett Anderson each time he braves to make physical contact with the crowd.
The most poignant moment of the night, and perhaps the most memorable, is the closing trio of songs from the back end of Dog Man Star, which singer Brett Anderson dedicates to the victims of the previous night’s attacks in Paris. Mournful and dramatic in tone, tracks like ‘Still Life’ and ‘The Two of Us’ brought tears to the eyes of many. ‘The Asphalt World’ between the two seeming all the more dramatic with Oakes’ solo almost searing.
If this is just the start of Suede‘s creative resurgence, then things could get very exciting for fans of one the 90’s most underrated bands.
http://www.hitthefloor.com/reviews/sued ... um-141115/


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