08 Feb 16 Royal Glasgow Concert Hall

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sunshine
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08 Feb 16 Royal Glasgow Concert Hall

Postby sunshine » 09 Feb 2016, 21:24

They played

Night Thoughts: When You Are Young, Outsiders, No Tomorrow, Pale Snow, I Don’t Know How To Reach You, What I’m Trying To Tell You, Tightrope, Learning To Be, Like Kids, I Can’t Give Her What She Wants, When You Were Young, The Fur & The Feathers

Hits & Treats: Hollywood, Flashboy, Trash, Nitrate, He's Dead, Float Away, This Time (acoustic), So Young, Mickey, Beautiful Ones
Encore: Flow (acoustic), New Generation

sunshine
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Re: 08 Feb 16 Royal Glasgow Concert Hall

Postby sunshine » 09 Feb 2016, 21:24

9 Feb 2016
Suede play biggest anthems for Glasgow crowd
JULES BOYLE attended the Royal Concert Hall gig.
PLAYING a classic album in its entirety is nothing new, but it's not often a band pulls the same trick with their latest release.
Suede went one further though, opening their show with a full run through of new album Night Thoughts from behind a screen, accompanied by a harrowing film shot by Libertines photographer Roger Sargent.
A series of scenes of a dying man's life as he drowns himself in the sea, the film's non-linear structure thread up snapshots of his dysfunctional relationships and the accidental death of his child. It was bleak stuff, with the band only visible through the screen at key moments where their prescribe enhanced or complemented the visuals. Eschewing the usual concert routines of breaks between songs for chat and response, Suede ran each track into each other, creating an immersive environment where there was no escape. Songs like When You Are Young and Outsiders were suitably cinematic, taking Suede's natural affinity for a dramatic melody and ramping it up several levels, while I Can't Give Her What She Wants was properly heartbreaking and devastating in its raw emotions.
If the first half was a somber affair, it was the polar opposite when the band returned after a short interval. This time, the screen was up and Suede were out to entertain, rattling through a set of greatest hits and surprises that caused absolute mayhem in the crowd from the off. This Hollywood Life and Killing Of A Flash Boy kicked things off in triumphant style, but it was on a never-more defiant Trash that they really switched into high gear, with frontman Brett Anderson running into the middle of the crowd to lead them on its huge chorus. The singer's energy and commitment to his music couldn't be faulted, constantly moving, constantly pushing every ounce of feeling and passion out of himself and into the room on tracks like So Young and Animal Nitrate.
Weirdly, Brett doesn't even look that different from the band's 90s heyday. The moves are still as slinky as ever, with the singer shaking his hips as he swings the microphone around his head as far as it will go. The rest of the band were on top form too, with Richard Oakes and Neil Codling's spiralling guitar riffs thundering over the top of the always-impressive rhythm section of Suede stalwarts Matt Osman and Simon Gilbert The band dropped away to silence to let him sing a few lines of Sometimes I Feel I'll Float Away acapella before launching back into the sing in epic style, but he topped himself even more when he lowered the mike to deliver a section of This Time unplugged. It said it all that the crowd could hear that stunning voice over the band even at the back of the hall.
From then on, it was one big song after another, with anthems like Metal Mickey and Beautiful Ones bring bellowed back at the stage by a capacity crowd who knew they had just seen something really special. Superb.
http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/whats-on/m ... QcZCZh2.97

sunshine
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Re: 08 Feb 16 Royal Glasgow Concert Hall

Postby sunshine » 09 Feb 2016, 21:25

9 Feb 2016
Suede, Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow, gig review: Band haven’t changed, but nor have they dulled
There are few bands who have tackled the angst and uncertainty of middle-age with as much clear-eyed dedication as that of their youth
David Pollock |
“We are Suede, and you are the audience,” smiles Brett Anderson, the first instalment of his band’s full live return to UK stages almost complete. “We have this good relationship, don’t we?” It’s impossible to imagine Anderson, still possessed of a certain youthfully self-confident swagger at the age of 48, being genuinely nervous, but it wasn’t until the gentle acoustic encore of ‘Everything Will Flow’ that he appeared to relax. Last month Suede released their seventh album Night Thoughts, the second since their 2010 reunion and most successful since 1999’s Head Music, and with it appears to come a new level of ambition.
Of course, it’s now difficult to consider any pop music which bears a sense of self-awareness and aspiration without relating it at least in passing to David Bowie, and certainly not in Suede’s case. Anderson himself has expressed weariness with the comparisons even as he’s embraced the obvious fact that ‘Life On Mars’-vintage Bowie was one of Suede’s defining templates, yet his band, survivors of two and a half decades in one iteration or another, have proven not to be as chameleonic as their inspiration.
After all this time they still hang perfectly poised between the explosive energy of rock star life and the grey repression of commuter belt suburbs, and for this tour they’ve chosen to accompany the new record in its entirety with a film by music photographer Roger Sargent. Screened on a floor-to-ceiling gauze hanging in front of the band, who are for the most part invisible in the darkness or occasionally picked out by spotlight, the film works more as a series of vignettes timed to accompany each song.
Narratively it’s non-linear and hard to grasp; hopping back and forward through time, it shows the courting of a young couple, the apparent accidental death of their young son, and the man’s breakdown, assault of his partner and eventual suicide. There’s a certain vagueness to the telling, and a continual lapse into the main character’s seeming fantasy that he’s a wide-boy East End gangster - throwing in out-of-place scenes of gunplay and partying which would be more suited to a Guy Ritchie film – but Sargent photographs the washed-out council estates, neon-scarred streets and barren countryside evoked by this music beautifully.
These visual accompaniments to the searing ‘Outsiders’, with the couple “thrown like two winter roses into a broken vase”, ‘No Tomorrow’s bittersweet yearning to “fight the sorrow like there’s no tomorrow” and the painful nostalgia of ‘When You Were Young’ couldn’t be more well-matched. Guitarists Richard Oakes and Neil Codling play the whole set loudly and passionately, and Anderson, shirt unbuttoned to the navel, delivers a second half of hits including ‘Trash’, Animal Nitrate’, ‘Metal Mickey’ and ‘Beautiful Ones’ with piercing commitment and occasional forays through the crowd.
“When our possessions are in black bags and we’ve shuffled off to nursing homes,” he ponders at the end, in the face of ferocious enthusiasm from the crowd, “at least we know tonight we left a little plus sign in the world.” Suede haven’t changed, but nor have they dulled – indeed, there are few bands who have tackled the angst and uncertainty of middle-age with as much clear-eyed dedication as that of their youth.
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 62831.html

sunshine
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Re: 08 Feb 16 Royal Glasgow Concert Hall

Postby sunshine » 15 Feb 2016, 16:28

13 February 2016
Britpop band Suede go hell for leather on the opening night of their short UK tour
By Graeme Thomson for The Mail on Sunday
GIG OF THE WEEK Suede Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow
Rating: 4/5
The hype around Suede’s emergence in 1992 – anointed ‘Best New Band in Britain’ by Melody Maker before they had released a single – suggested a group built for a sprint rather than a marathon.Yet here they are, almost 25 years later, outrunning Oasis, Pulp and the rest of their loosely affiliated Britpop peers. Since reuniting in 2010, Suede have enhanced their legacy with two fine albums: 2013’s Bloodsports and Night Thoughts, released last month.
There have always been two sides to Suede. Their trashy guitar aesthetic harks back to the playful, provocative days of glam rock, but they’re equally beholden to a suffocating – and very English – sense of urban despair. They embraced both obsessions on the opening night of a short UK tour that ends at the O2 Academy, Leeds, tonight – a two-hour Jekyll-and-Hyde affair as challenging as it is powerful As the title suggests, Night Thoughts is more J G Ballard than Marc Bolan. Such is their confidence in it that during the first half of the show Suede play the entire album in sequence, accompanied by Roger Sargent’s bespoke 50-minute film.
It’s a typically grandiose and risky conceit. The film opens with a figure walking into the sea and then plays out a series of scenes from the life of a drowning man whose family has undergone a devastating tragedy. Zoolander 2 it is not. As the band perform behind the movie screen, shadowed and uncommunicative, music, movement and images synch impressively.
It’s powerful and beautifully realised, but boy is it bleak. No Tomorrow, Like Kids and What I’m Trying To Tell You sparkle like classic Suede, but Night Thoughts is otherwise heavy on ballads. After almost an hour of melancholia with a side-order of relentlessly unsettling visual cues, Glasgow is ready for catharsis.
When they tried to break America, the band ran into a trademark dispute with successful New York cabaret singer Suede. Hence, in the US, they go under the name 'The London Suede'. Thankfully, where part one was cerebral and immersive, part two is a kinetic joy, the audience rewarded for its forbearance with a set bursting with hits and oldies.
Brett Anderson steps into the spotlight to sing the swaggering This Hollywood Life, looking and sounding indecently well preserved for a man who came close to a drug-induced demise in the Nineties. The mood goes from contemporary arts centre to heaving club. ‘Ya sexy b******!’ yells one woman approvingly. In crisp shirt and black trousers, Anderson is more peak-period Dirk Bogarde than Britpop wastrel these days, but he remains a magnificent frontman, buzzing with charisma and vitality. By Trash he’s throwing himself into the crowd – twice!! Suede’s youthful provocations, Animal Nitrate, Metal Mickey, So Young, crackle with frenzied energy and still sound remarkably cool and contemporary. Following singalong acoustic renditions of This Time and Everything Will Flow, a closing New Generation, from 1994’s brooding Dog Man Star, captures the blend of nostalgia and futurism that always defined Suede – and which, remarkably, appears to be more effective than ever.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/event/a ... -tour.html


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