black rainbows reviews

For all your discussions about Brett's solo career.
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black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 14 Sep 2011, 21:30

bbc (the first line says it all!):

An intermittently promising teaser for the main event: a new Suede album.
Kevin Harley 2011-09-12
If Brett Anderson’s fourth solo album isn’t quite the fringe-flicking hit hoped for from a man who reclaimed his fop-rock crown at Suede’s reunion gigs, the reason might lie in the timing. Working with go-to session guy Leo Abrahams, Anderson mapped out Black Rainbows before Suede’s resurgence. So it’s less an album spurred by Suede’s rebirth than his flirtation with the idea of fronting a rock band again, still the metier that most suits Anderson but one that’s only tentatively embraced here.
A self-reinvention it isn’t, as the cover affirms. Cheekbones? Check. Shadows? Check. But Black Rainbows at least quiets concerns that Anderson’s hair is fuller than his creative tank. If his morose 2009 album, Slow Attack, made Anderson sound aged before his time – the camp-macho king of wastrel town reduced to glum reveries about swans and sipping tea – the opening fuzz of feedback here suggests he’s popped some pain relief and started sloughing off the 90s hangover.
The opening Unsung slow-broods towards the kind of epically swooning chorus his voice is made for. The single Brittle Heart is better still, summoning reserves of louche swagger to prove that there’s nothing like a cocksure and nonchalant melody to offset an over-reliance on bohemian-romantic clichés (hello, "ashtray eyes" and "carpet burns") and stretch a limited range.
The mid-section lets him down, slumping into the bad habits of his debut solo album. This Must Be Where It Ends peddles vagaries ("Mysteries help me ’cause your hair is like the autumn") even more befuddling than the extravagantly bewildering Colour of the Night from his solo debut. Tune-wise, The Exiles and I Count the Times refuse to stick after 10 assiduously counted plays, favouring enervating portent over propulsion.
Thankfully, he rallies for the end run. Actors picks up the pace; Thin Men Dancing’s knuckle-dragging riff almost apes Oasis; and Possession swoons with serene prettiness. Abrahams’ backing could be more buff: he tends to leave respectful space for Anderson’s vocals when he should be needling him like Bernard Butler’s guitar used to. Presumably, that’ll be a job for the planned Suede album, for which Black Rainbows acts as an intermittently promising teaser.

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Re: black swans reviews

Postby mark » 15 Sep 2011, 11:50

'Black Swans'??? :S wtf??? I thought his album was called 'Black Rainbows'????!!!! :O man you got me confused now - He had a song called 'The Swans' on SA and there is a film called 'Black Swan' but... erm... lol!!!... :? :? :? :!: :?:

And btw surely the line is "mistress help me" not "mysteries help me"???... If it's the latter then i'm dissapointed because i've always heard it as 'mistress' and liked that line!!!... If it is 'mistress' then the silly twat reviewing shouldn't take the piss and be befuddled because it's just his incompettance at understanding!!!! - if it IS 'mysteries' then he's quite right hahahaha :P

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 15 Sep 2011, 21:14

haha... my bad... tooo busy these days

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby mark » 17 Sep 2011, 16:22

hahaha - you should have lept it as 'black swns' - made me laugh hahaha!!!/// that was a cardinal sin, to forget a Brett album title - no excuses - you're slipping josé hahaha!!... btw I AM right thinking it's 'mistress' right???...

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 18 Sep 2011, 06:32

:lol: :roll:

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 22 Sep 2011, 07:48

http://www.musicweek.com/story.asp?sect ... 046626&c=1

Brett Anderson : Black Rainbows (BA Songs)
16 September 2011

By Ed Miller

Mention a Brett Anderson solo work to many a Suede fan and there's often a shrug of indifference or grimace of disapproval. With three of his own albums behind him, each increasingly sparse and introspective, Anderson's priority has hardly been to win back those who wanted little more than foot-stomping, mic-wiggling duplicates of Suede classics.

Cathartic and in many ways captivating as some of his solo work has been to date, the announcement that this fourth album was to see a return to a rockier, more energetic sound was greeted with much enthusiasm, especially off the back of the universally-acclaimed Suede reunion gigs.

By and large, Black Rainbows is all it promised to be. It's not the noisy, in-yer-face glam rampage that might have been envisaged by promises of Anderson's "back to basics" approach. Instead there remains a reliance on songs loosely described as ballads, which is no bad thing given Anderson's emotive voice and the fact that many of the tracks here are of a quality that calls to mind Suede's early album tracks and b-sides.

Opener Unsung is a case in point, arguably the best thing Anderson has written in a decade, an arresting soaring epic that calls to mind the foremost of Suede's slower numbers such as The 2 Of Us. Lead single Brittle Heart, a confident return to form, sees the singer back to using the kind of lyrical imagery he was feted and lampooned for in equal measure, with ashtray eyes, carpet burns and antiseptic skies to the fore.


Crash About To Happen has a late Eighties feel about it that seems curiously at odds as the album's mid-section settles into a steady pace with I Count The Times, The Exiles and the lush, beautiful This Must Be Where It Ends, all of them driven by a dark, audacious undercurrent. Actors will be a candidate for the next single, the cut and thrust of its chorus the rockiest number on Black Rainbows by far. In The House Of Numbers, with its Echo & The Bunnymen-esque resonance, rounds off a run of eight stellar songs that in an ideal world would propel this album into plenty of end-year lists.

Thin Men Dancing ups the guitar ante again and album closer, the slow-burning Possession, is typical of Anderson's previous solo output. If there's a criticism, it is that these two final tracks don't maintain the standard set by the rest of the album, but it's a moot point really.

Black Rainbows is constantly ambitious, in places louder and rockier, and consistently enchanting. Destined, no doubt, to be eclipsed by new Suede material, it nevertheless stands by itself as one of the year's more striking albums - and proves that at nearly 44 years of age, Anderson still has more to say than many aspiring songwriters half his age.

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 24 Sep 2011, 16:38

the independent

Album: Brett Anderson, Black Rainbows (EMI)
(Rated 3/ 5 )
Reviewed by Andy Gill - 23/09/11

Recorded in January 2010, just a few months after the release of Slow Attack, this presages last year's well-received Suede reformation both temporally and stylistically, Brett Anderson deliberately eschewing its predecessor's intriguing orchestrations in favour of something more "restless, noisy and dynamic"", created from standard rock instrumentation.
Its brief gestation (recorded in just three days) is both Black Rainbows' trump card and its Achilles heel: while imparting a palpable sense of immediacy to the performances, there are some tracks that could do with more work. But it's a decent enough effort, Anderson relishing the return to gutter glamour and devotion, while his band shifts nimbly from skeletal and steely to driving and anthemic.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 59177.html

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 26 Sep 2011, 06:04

BRETT ANDERSON: BLACK RAINBOWS - ALBUM REVIEW
26th September 2011 By Jim Hiscox
SUEDE’S reunion last year was one of the most successful comebacks in recent rock history, and it’s given Brett the confidence to return to their electric sound.
Where his previous solo albums were dark and mysterious, Brett’s back to sounding like a passionate rock star, blessed with the energy that made Suede so huge in the first place.
Ignore the gloomy title and daft cover art, Brett’s finally reminding us why he’s one of the most intriguing singers in Britain.

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/music/view/2 ... um-Review/

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 26 Sep 2011, 06:05

CD: Brett Anderson - Black RainbowsPlundering from a different decade does Brett the world of good
by Joe Muggs|Sunday, 25 September 2011|
Brett in blossom on Black RainbowsI never really dug Suede. I could hear great pop songwriting in some of their work, but their rampant adoption of Bowie-as-Ziggy-Stardust sonics and vocal tics seemed to be just as representative of Britpop's necrophiliac tendencies as did Oasis's tired Beatle-isms. So I'm slightly puzzled as to why I'm enjoying this record by their singer as much as I am, given that it is almost as retro – albeit in a different way.
The soundscape of Black Rainbows is a return to rock after the orchestral stylings of previous solo records, but it belongs to the mid-1980s. In particular there is a Goth jangle to the guitars that recalls The Cult, Siouxie & The Banshees and Anderson's fellow Ziggy obsessives Bauhaus. The Smiths' wiry grooves are there, too, and the occasionally narcotic grit of pre-Loveless My Bloody Valentine. You can even, for all Anderson's studied archness, hear the most gauche reach-for-the-stars romanticism of The Waterboys and early U2 in the self-abasing love song “Brittle Heart”.
Maybe it's because there's a wider spread of influences, maybe it's because in amongst all this, Anderson's voice is now really his own. Maybe it's just that age suits him and it feels like he's no longer trying overly hard to be a rock god while simultaneously undermining himself with that archness. Whatever, this is an easy record to get swept up in, the sound of a bruised romantic seemingly learning to be comfortable in his own skin. Sometimes it even suggests the shameless grandiosity that Coldplay could achieve if they weren't so cripplingly wet. As good an argument for middle age as I've heard in a while.

http://www.theartsdesk.com/new-music/cd ... k-rainbows

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 26 Sep 2011, 19:05

Brett Anderson - 'Black Rainbows' (Brett Anderson) Released: 26/09/11
A lyricist of uncompromising quality and a hopeless romantic...

September 26, 2011 by Andrew Almond Share Suede Tickets
Brett Anderson, by all accounts, has been through a lot. For a man in his early 40s he has already endured a crippling drug addiction, the break up and reconciliation with forming sparring partner Bernard Butler, and over 20 years in the public eye. With this in mind the recording and release of a fourth solo album, 'Black Rainbows', must seem like a walk in the park for the idiosyncratic 43 year-old.

Brooding album opener 'Unsung', begins seemingly as a slow burner tinged with Anderson’s characteristic melancholy (“those impossible clouds are gathering now”), before the sweeping melody of the chorus transforms it into a ballad of the bleakest nature. The mood recalls 'Now My Heart is Full', the opener from Morrissey’s landmark solo release 'Vauxhall and I'.

'Brittle Heart' demonstrates Anderson’s trademark tortured romanticism and beautifully ambiguous lyrics, as he pleads “give me your brittle heart and your ashtray eyes” but despite this it’s one of 'Black Rainbow'’s more accessible moments and acts as highlight of the record’s first half whilst containing some of the finest lyrics Anderson has written in years: “I’ll make a an effigy from a lock of your hair, and all the cinders and ashes can be ours to share” he pines.

The drive time radio friendly jangle pop of 'Crash About To Happen' follows before 'I Count the Times' and 'The Exiles' sees Anderson write the sort of dark brooding rock anthems that Editors and White Lies could but dream of creating.

Anderson’s gift for wrapping melodies around the most abstruse of lyrics and sparsest musical arrangements is no more evident than on the gorgeous “This Must Be Where It Ends”. Anderson cries out for help to a “mistress” before the track’s epic production builds to a colossal crescendo which is all strings, tortured vocal and grandiose production.

It is perhaps only Actors which fails reach the heights of the rest of the album, with it’s almost “Suede-by-numbers” feel due to the industrial, abrasive guitar backing but struggles under the awkwardness of its patchwork composition.

The shimmering guitar chords of In The House Of Numbers bleeds into penultimate track Thin Men Dancing which recalls mid-period Bowie with its confident swagger and pompous stomp. Perhaps the title is a direct reference to the Thin White Duke, who knows?

Anderson yearns on 'Black Rainbows’ closing track, 'Possession', about the “weakness I feel when I hear her name” and herein lies an indication as to the best way to sum up what is an album defined by its heartbreaking beauty. Beneath it all; the addiction, the high profile fall outs and shape shifting 20 year career, Black Rainbows proves that Anderson is still both a lyricist of uncompromising quality and a hopeless romantic. What’s more he’s all the better for it.

You can keep up to date with all the latest news from Gigwise by following us on Twitter and liking us on Facebook.

http://www.gigwise.com/reviews/albums/6 ... sed-260911

(funny they have put suede tickets...)

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 26 Sep 2011, 19:10

Brett Anderson: Black Rainbows
The Suede front man gives Dazed an in-depth interview, focusing on his musical origins, the beginning of the band and how his writing has changed throughout his career
Text by Sam Ballard

Hype is a strange concept. For those who have endured it, the outcome can have perversely alienating effects – while popular among swathes of people, it also isolates those who are consciously suspicious of anything remotely resembling faddishness. Suede is one band that endured this process. After forming in 1989 the band was making music that was like nothing going on around them – the time was filled with mostly Shoegaze and the preliminary days of Grunge – and consequently they were passed over by numerous A&R record men. Fast forward three years of writing, rehearsing and playing to empty rooms and Suede are on the cover of Melody Maker, proclaimed ‘The Best New Band In Britain’. They hadn’t even released a single.

Fast forward again to 2011 and Dazed is sitting with Anderson over a drink in Soho. His new solo album, Black Rainbows, is out on 26 September. From an objective, and with all the benefits of hindsight, perspective, what’s interesting with Anderson is that throughout his, and Suede’s, career the maintenance of an unwavering autonomy has kept him on a rollercoaster trajectory with the zeitgeist ever since 1989. For Anderson though, it is his artistic impulses, rather than careerist profiteering, that have formed the basis of his releases. A refreshing stance in a time where more and more artists are in it for the wrong reasons. We spoke to the front man about forming Suede, his musical upbringing and how his writing has changed – right up to the making of Black Rainbows.

Dazed Digital: What made you first want to be in band?
Brett Anderson: My father was quite obsessed with music, so it stems from my upbringing. He was an obsessive classical music fan and used to go on pilgrimages to Hungary to visit Franz Liszt’s birthplace in his Morris Traveller. My mother was an artist, a painter, so I suppose I come from quite a creative background – a working class background: it was a council house but not a clichéd estate. It was on the edge of a wood. We didn’t have any money but there was quite a lot of culture in the house, and a lot of music, and like any self-respecting teenager, you decide that your parents’ music is crap – my dad would force feed me Liszt, Berlioz and Chopin and I’d tell him it was a load of shit and look for my own badge of identity, which I found in punk and post-punk with bands like Crass and Discharge.

DD: Have you always written?
Brett Anderson: I’ve always written songs, I haven’t ever just ‘written’ and I’d never consider myself a poet or anything like that. I’ve always loved the power of the simplicity that a really good pop song has and the way it can move you. I love that sense that you can sit down with an acoustic guitar and write some words with a melody and if you do it right it can be life changing. It’s the same kind of thing that I guess you can sit down in front of a typewriter with 26 letters and from that; the only limits are your imagination. There’s something very exciting about having limits but at the same time having absolutely none and it’s the same with song writing.

DD: When did you start writing with Bernard Butler?
Brett Anderson: In 1989 as soon as I met him – the year we formed Suede. I was still finishing my degree and at the time it was me, Justine (Frischmann) and Matt (Osman) playing together in bedrooms. We knew that to start taking the whole thing seriously we needed a guitar player. I could play but I was never a ‘guitar player’, I was more of a writer. So we put an advert in the NME, and Bernard Butler answered. That was the day Suede formed – September 1989 – 22 years ago now. Writing together was what we always planned to do – as soon as I met him and realised he was the type of person I wanted to write with. There was always a Morrissey and Marr relationship that we wanted to use as a template that and I think he very much wanted to have that kind of counter-figure to work with.

DD: It’s an incredibly intimate relationship to have with someone isn’t it?
Brett Anderson: I think it is, yeah. You have to know someone very well - you have to be part of their life. You can’t do it by post – there must be a foundation to the relationship. It can be very personal and your writing partner is the only person you’re willing to play songs to. You trust them and you’re also inspired by them – it’s a happy rivalry where you’re challenging each other but it’s a very positive experience: I’ve done this, where are you going to take it? And that’s what it was like when we were writing for the first Suede album with songs like ‘Sleeping Pills’ – it felt we were really taking it somewhere.

DD: When you started, do you feel that you benefited from the space you were given by the industry because you weren’t ‘like’ anything else going on at the time?
Brett Anderson: Definitely. We learned how to play, how to write, that kind of thing. It’s very important. A lot of record companies have a gambling attitude on a band and they might have a hit record and they might not. If they don’t, then they’re out the door; if they do, then they make another record. We were lucky enough to be out of that whole process because nobody wanted to know us, which was great, but very frustrating. The second you’re up on stage you want everybody to listen to you but it’s not necessarily the best thing for you. It’s very hard playing to one person in the audience – the humiliation of that process is very frustrating - but it’s also very necessary.

DD: The transition from struggling to generate interest in Suede to having every label wanting to sign you must have been huge. Especially with Melody Maker putting you on the cover as the best new band in the UK?
Brett Anderson: They put us on the cover the week before we even had a single out. They were very excited about what we were doing, which was original and interesting and it went against the grain. It very much had its own clearly defined personality and they put their faith in it, but looking back, was it a good thing for Suede to have that much press early on? Probably not

DD: Why?
Brett Anderson: It put as many people off as it attracted but that’s the nature of it. We were used as guinea pigs by the media a little bit. Unwillingly but what’s the alternative? Last week you’re in the dole queue and this week you’re being asked if you want to be on the cover of magazines. But you don’t have that avuncular arm around your shoulder saying maybe you should just calm down a bit. You just go for it. That’s what rock ‘n’ roll is all about – extremity, taking a huge bite out of the fucking cherry and spitting out the pip. You just go with it and it’s only with hindsight that you can evaluate whether things have been good for your band. But no, I don’t think that the huge deluge of press was 100 per cent good for Suede. I think it distorted the world a lot for us, and the colossal weight of the expectation wasn’t good for the band – it raised the stakes and made it interesting - but probably not that good for us.

DD: Do you think that the ‘distorted’ image put off people who hadn’t even heard you?
Brett Anderson: Yeah - for me personally, if I hear anything overly glowing about a band or anything really fashionable – in the sense that it has this white heat around it - then I’ll leave it and let it filter through to me. I’m very like that. If it’s still good in six months time then I’ll pick up on it. I hate faddishness – I’m automatically very suspicious of it and Suede were at the vanguard of all that. If I’d been sitting there watching us from the perspective of objectivity then I probably wouldn’t have liked us.

DD: As a writer do you prefer working on your own or collaboratively?
Brett Anderson: I always feel that I need someone else to challenge me. I can write on my own but I like the feeling of not being in total control as a writer. That’s what I’ve done with the new album – I didn’t want to have the role of being in ultimate control. There had to be an element of the unknown so we went into the studio with a band and just jammed for three days and I didn’t know how it was going to turn out but that gave me that sense of the unknown. It could have been a fucking disaster but I had enough faith in the guy I was working with, Leo Abrahams, to know that together we could steer it in the right direction. I took the jams away and wrote these songs on top of them but there was definitely this element of not being in total control and I like that. I like not being the man who decides absolutely everything. I get my best work when doing that – I need a foil.

DD: How would you say that you’ve changed as a writer over the 22 years?
Brett Anderson: I’ve gone through phases. I went through a stage of wanting my writing to be simpler; my early songs were very veiled and murky in their meaning. With a lot of them it’s only been recently that I’ve worked out what they’ve been about. That’s quite interesting – that you can write a song twenty years ago, in this fog of confusion and only work out later what it’s about. It’s a very interesting concept. In the late nineties, I wanted to write simpler songs like ‘She’s in Fashion’ and ‘Film Star’, which I liked because they had an honesty of being about something concrete.

With the new album I’ve gone back to falling in love with the beauty of the obscure – I love shadows - in art and photography - because you don’t know what’s there, it could be anything and that sense of the viewer’s mind joining the dots is what I love. The cliché of a song having a different interpretation for whoever listens to it is a powerful concept. With Black Rainbows I’ve written in a more veiled way because pop music for me is about pushing emotional buttons where you don’t know what the answer is going to be – you’re just deepening the mystery.


DD: I read in a recent interview that you wanted to apologise for everything that took place during the making of Head Music. Was that quite a dark time?
Brett Anderson: It was the darkest time. There were a lot of drugs around, it’s well documented, but it was a point where I personally was losing the plot a bit and the band was disintegrating. It was a strange record. We were trying to do something very different musically as well: going from rock to a more electronic style, which was quite interesting. It was all part of the madness of making that record. It’s a strange album because half of it is amazing and half of it suffers with the confusion of the time. I think looking back at Suede, the nineties would have been a lot different without us….probably a lot better.

DD: What’s next for you?
Brett Anderson: After we’ve toured this album I’m going to start writing with Suede again. We’ll see where it takes us – it could be to a new Suede album, it may not, depending on results. I’m not going to promise anything but we’ll see how it goes.

DD: Excited?
Brett Anderson: I’m always excited for what the next thing is. It’s always the most important thing in my life at the time. I’d love to make a new Suede album and I’d love it to be brilliant but it won’t exist unless it is brilliant. It’s not going to be made to flog a tour on the back of.

Black Rainbows is out 26 September



http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/artic ... k-rainbows

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 26 Sep 2011, 19:11

Playlist - Brett Anderson's 'Songs in the key of Black'
Brett Anderson returns with his fourth solo album Black Rainbows today (26 September, and from which Brittle Heart above is taken). To celebrate him stepping out on the town alone, before he's due to regroup with Suede to record new material, and get us in the mood for Black Rainbows, Mr Anderson has compiled Q this little playlist of "songs in the Key of Black".



http://news.qthemusic.com/2011/09/playl ... s_son.html

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 26 Sep 2011, 19:16

Brett Anderson - Black Rainbows
(EMI) UK release date: 26 September 2011
by Gareth Ware

The art of the male solo album – especially if you're in/were in a respected band – can be difficult to get right. You only have to look at Buzzcocks' Pete Shelley or Magazine's Howard Devoto to see how solo work can disappear without trace, destined to be curios for diehard fans. In recent times the same can be levelled at all of The Strokes, and The Libertines' Pete Doherty and Carl Barat. In fact, arguably the only artists to have made it work are Richard Hawley (and let's be honest, how many people buying Hawley's records conceivably remember The Longpigs?) and Jarvis Cocker (who's somehow managed to adopt the role of music's equivalent of Stephen Fry in the national treasure stakes).

It's a ring into which Brett Anderson feels the need to throw his hat occasionally. Although he already has an enviable back catalogue with assorted incarnations of his band (as shown by the successes of the Suede reissues and reunion shows), Black Rainbows is his fourth solo outing. Does he really have anything left to prove?

Unsung sets the tone with an enviable sense of ease. Big, bold and confident, on it Anderson croons "life is your love song, unsung" while strings sweep and swell, giving the song an undeniably impressive, effortless grace. Lead single Brittle Heart meanwhile manages to join the dots between Head Music-era Suede singles such She's In Fashion and Everything Will Flow and Elbow's One Day Like Today. As with Unsung, it demonstrates that Anderson remains confident in his continued abilities as a songwriter. A strong opening trio is completed via the instant and accessible Crash About To Happen.

But it's here that the record starts to fall over somewhat. While it's easy (or lazy) to draw comparisons to Anderson's former glories, there are times when the album doesn't help itself. Ignoring track I Count The Times – which appears to have half-inched its chorus straight from All Saints' Pure Shores – any of The Exiles, Actors, or Thin Men Dancing could've been lifted off a late-period Suede record. That said, that's not always a bad thing – Actor sounds like the galloping lost single, at once familiar and new.

There are still some gems to come though, aside from the opening trio. The percussive, melodic House Of Numbers and plaintive, beautific and haunting album closer Possession demonstrate that Anderson still has a knack of pulling a genuinely mesmerising composition out of the hat at a moment's notice.

This album was a risk that Anderson didn't need to take, so the question remains if he's succeeded where others have failed. It at least leaves more questions than answers. Will it generate mainstream appeal for Anderson or will it remain a curio for die-hard Suede fans? Does he have it in him to make another solo record? On the basis of Black Rainbows it's hard to say. While a good half of the album demonstrates a genuine songwriting nous, other elements hint at a mere rehashing of old Suede ideas. More's the pity, as the opening three tracks alone are worth the price of admission and deserve widespread recognition, and when the album's firing on all cylinders it's a joy to behold. It has to be said, however, that it's hard to see the release as a whole do much more than emulate Albert Hammond Jr's solo endeavours, for this is pleasant yet inessential stuff.

http://www.musicomh.com/albums/brett-an ... 3_0911.htm

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby mark » 29 Sep 2011, 00:14

Yeah generally speaking they're all pretty good/great reviews... :D Even nme.com gave it 7/10 and said it's possibly his best solo work to date!!!...

http://www.nme.com/reviews/brett-anderson/12324

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Re: black rainbows reviews

Postby sunshine » 29 Sep 2011, 06:10

:D


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