De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

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sunshine
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De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

Post by sunshine » 18 Mar 2015, 06:52

SUEDE PLUS SUPPORT
Thursday, 25/6/15
7:00PM
De La Warr Pavilion

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Re: De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

Post by sunshine » 26 Jun 2015, 22:04

amazing gig and venue by the sea... only spoilt by the son of Hitler that was there as a security guy who did not let us take pics or record anything...

they played an amazing setlist: Painted People, Snowblind, Heroine, To the Birds, Insatiable One, Sound of the Streets, Tightrope, Can't Give Her What She Wants, Strangers, Starts & Ends, So Young, Metal Mickey, Filmstar, Float Away, By the Sea, She, Trash, Animal Nitrate, Beautiful Ones
Encore: 2 of Us, Asphalt World, Still Life
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Re: De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

Post by sunshine » 27 Jun 2015, 22:08

http://sussexsedition.blogspot.co.uk/20 ... l?spref=fb
Friday, June 26, 2015
By The Sea
When Suede played the opening bars to the gorgeous By The Sea at Bexill-on-Sea's De La Warr Pavilion last night, Brett Anderson allowed himself a wry grin and told us, "we had to play this tonight". And perhaps not just because of the coastal setting, but because it is one of the best of those sumptuous Suede ballads that manage to be both uplifting and melancholy at the same time. With a repertoire of such quality, it must be a difficult task for the band to decide what to leave out of their set.
Anderson asks us for our indulgence in the first part as they run through some less obvious song choices but all with that trademark loose and dirty guitar sound, as if Mick Ronson had been in a punk band. That sound was first heard on their clutch of early records, and it is from the B sides of those singles and their most recent album, 2013's Bloodsports, that the opening numbers are drawn.
If not all of the crowd are familiar with Suede's earliest and latest material, this has no effect on the thrilling atmosphere. Anderson prowls the stage between the glam racket of Richard Oakes and Neil Codling's guitars and the rumble of silhouetted pair Mat Osman and Simon Gilbert's rhythm, whipping the air with the microphone lead and clearly having fun. The gear-change for the audience comes with Filmstar, from 1996's Coming Up, which is greeted with wild hysteria. Suede's third album was made after Bernard Butler had left the band; producing five top ten singles, and with all the other tracks sounding like hits, it was the band's biggest album. They could have played it in its entirety and garnered a similar reaction to every song. As it is, we have to settle for three more.
We also get those early singles - So Young, Metal Mickey and Animal Nitrate - which reminds me of the salvation the band brought. The early 1990s was a fairly arid time for new alternative music: the interregnum between the end of Madchester and the birth of Britpop was filled with the imported self-loathing of grunge, or even poorer domestic facsimiles. That music lacked grace, style and humour, and seemed to be only a hairsbreadth away from the male posturing of heavy metal. Then, enter Suede. Fronted by an androgynous council house back bedroom dreamer, and with a swift-wristed rock 'n' roll guitarist at his side, they dispelled the drabness of the Seattle sound with an injection of energy and urban poetry - "through the slippery city we ride/skyline swine on the circuit" - that paved the way for a British resurgence.
Having played a lengthy set, Suede return to the stage for an encore composed of a triptych of songs from arguably their greatest album, Dog Man Star: the beautifully tender, The 2 of Us - "Watching my mistakes/I listened to the band" - is followed by the sexual hollowness of The Asphalt World; and then, finally, the symphonic crescendo of Still Life sends us away, "into the night".

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Re: De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

Post by sunshine » 27 Jun 2015, 23:45

http://www.theargus.co.uk/leisure/criti ... __June_25/
Suede, De La Warr Pavilion, Marina, Bexhill, Thursday, June 25
First published Friday 26 June 2015 in The Critic
by Duncan Hall
Coming home to Sussex, Suede frontman Brett Anderson demonstrated why he is one of the finest rock frontmen the UK has produced in the last 25 years.
Throughout the Bexhill show he was out at the front, swinging his microphone in long arcs from its lead, jumping off the monitors and reaching out to the crowd.
And his voice was still as distinctive as ever, even if he had to ask for help with the high notes.
The response he got from the sold-out audience was arena-worthy - making the ears ring.
Part of this was down to the ingenious structure of the show – starting out aimed squarely at the hardcore fans with a hefty mix of b-sides including rarities Painted People and The Sound Of The Streets, combined with material from latest album Bloodsports.
But the second half was devoted to the band’s first three albums, bringing in the rest of the audience already galvanised by Anderson’s charismatic performance.
The band’s ear for an epic hasn’t left them – as evidenced by new song Tightrope.
The band’s choice of music before they walked onstage summed them up perfectly – going from The Sex Pistols’ edgiest three minutes, Bodies, to the epic sweep of Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto. It’s that musical combination of state of the nation lyrics and sweeping romantic orchestration which keeps fans so devoted.
Five stars

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Re: De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

Post by sunshine » 01 Jul 2015, 23:56

Wednesday, 01 July 2015
SUEDE Bexhill De La Warr Pavillion 25 June 2015
Written by Mark Reed
By The Sea.
Since moving to be by the sea 10 years ago, I've changed.. and I haven't. I've got older and wiser, and I've got smarter. And with age, there's always a risk... of being boring. Or mediocrity. Of losing touch of who you once were. Of betraying your ideals. Of a million things, and yet also, a risk of never changing, never evolving, remaining stoically, an intellectual statue. I've changed in the 10 years, and yet, 10 years ago, the sea called to me as home. I may live a few miles from the waves, but it feels like home, in a way that nowhere has since I was 21.
When a big band announces a small show in a town hall on a sea front for a late June night... that means one thing. They're probably playing Glastonbury. When Suede announced a one-off show in Bexhill's beautiful, Art Deco, De La Warr Pavillion, the next show to be announced was no surprise. Suede, after all, are long past the reunion stage of their career now, over five years in, with a new album under their belt, and well into the stage of work on Suede#7. The initial flush of any reunion, the sense of novelty with a return, has faded now, the band back into the life of being a working, touring band. Being their first full length show in a year and with no expectations, Suede open with a half hour that is, for the aficionado, a dream setlist of 4 rare b-sides. Suede don't write b-sides : they just write songs that don't go on the albums, and these songs - “Painted People” gets played live for only the second time since 1993, and “The Sound Of The Streets” the first time since 2003 (and only the eleventh time ever). Both show no signs of aging poorly, shall we say
To some, Suede's formula has dated, but then, it was dated then, being both aware of a form of musical history, and also sounding ancient and modern. There's lashings of rock, a deep and well known love of loud guitars, built alongside delicate and understated texture, a beautiful ripple as the muscle passes by. Songs like “Snowblind” sound fresh and as vital as the band did in their youth – there's non sense of ineffectual self-parody that dogged them in their final moments. Something like “For The Strangers”, for example, is timeless, sounding like a great song for their glory years – even though it is only two years old – it slips in like it always belonged.
In many ways, this is a classic Suede show. Where Suede always excelled was on the stage, live, and in your world. You're never far from a hit single or a modern classic, and the set – despite being quite light on hits (playing just 6 of their 21 singles from their first 1992-2003 lifespan) – doesn't feel like anything but a celebration of the past and the present and the future. There's new material, in the form of a revamped, dense “Tightrope” and the live premiere of an unexpected “Can't Give Her What She Wants”. These two songs, alongside the other new ones played live, indicate that in some way, Suede's new direction is that of a midlife crisis, a divorce album, a – god forbid - “No Jacket Required”, where love can conquer all, but it can also be frail, and fail.. and yet, still, we try to reach people, try to tell people, try to cross the gap between you and me to an us.
Unlike many recent shows, the sun snatches through the light of the evenings drapes, and the band play with a fluid connection as sunset slips in through the cracks: Neil Codling resembles a Ramone in white shirt, big hair, and leather jacket, and Mat Osman – taking advantage of Neil's position behind a keyboard for most of the show, takes the stage left at the front ; just like he used to.
Following up the two new songs is “Sometimes I Feel I'll Float Away” - which is just … well, it's my favourite of the newer songs for reasons too tediously personal to describe, but to still unlock new emotions, new feelings, and still to feel the same kind of invested transportation. The moment where music makes you see things in a new light after years, as if it was right there in front of your eyes, and you just couldn't see it. Songs that cut through everything to a moment in this world, buried in just one line. One look in your impossible eyes. It's the kind of song that would be known, the kind that, even at this late stage, demonstrates Suede still have something vital, and that there is no necessity to enter mediocrity just through the passing of time.
Being by the sea, they play “By The Sea”. Brett quips it - “I couldn't resist”. The final strait is four hits from the classic years, with “She”, “Animal Nitrate”, “Trash” and “The Beautiful Ones”, which make this dead, seaside town – where's Suede's appearance seems to have lowered the collective age of the town by around 40% to … under 50... come alive, and we're older, and babysitters don't work for free, but more than that, this is who we once were, and who we still are, alive, living, loving life and hoping hopes.
And then there's Brett Anderson. Who looks quietly overjoyed he finally got his job back after years in a self-imposed wilderness. And Richard Oakes, who never never gets the respect he deserves. Becried by some as a talented mimic, by others as well, overweight – as if that matters - , he's the man who singlehandedly saved Suede when they were written off as hasbeens, who authored four-and-a-half of their albums, who can seemingly play nearly anything thrown at him, who can conjour up a whirlwind of sound with just a guitar and some effects pedals, and whose abilities have been criminally underappreciated. His only crime is not being called Bernard Butler, which is absurd.
The grand finale is not all. From tonights set, a warm up for Glastonbury, the band only play 6 of the same songs at Pilton Farm, with 15 songs (and 90 minutes) only being played in Bexhill : and 11 songs only at Glastonbury. For the encore, the band eschew the usual hits set for a 25 minute “Dog Man Star” miniset, of “The 2 Of Us”, “The Asphalt World”, and “Still Life.” It's goddamn glorious, as a shilouetted Oakes makes the songs he did not write his own adopted children, wreaking a beautiful racket out of his guitar, and he nails it with an authority that betrays a quiet confidence having long stepped out of anyone else's shadow. It ends with “Still Life”, a song that, for me, forever, reminds me of the heady days of the insane Dog Man Star Tour, and a song that will bookend the imminent “Dog Man Star Live At The Albert Hall” release. It's grand in ambition and successful in execution, and a reminder that even in a sleepy seaside town on a boiling hot summer day, memories can be made that last lifetimes with nothing more complicated than guitars and good ideas. Suede aren't back, for they haven't been away, and they're just being what they always have been and what all great artists should be : we are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams.
http://www.thefinalword.co.uk/content/view/1318/35/

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Re: De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

Post by sunshine » 01 Jul 2015, 23:58

Live Review: Suede 25.6.15
Posted on June 28, 2015 4:04 pm by Jake Scott
Suede
In the midst of the pain of not being stuck in a collection of muddy fields and tents jam-packed with the lucky welly-donned few, Glastonbury warm up shows in select odd corners of the country are the next best option for fans more than a bit jealous of the weekend ahead, though in the case of Suede hitting the De La Warr Pavillion in the seaside nowhere town of Bexhill, it was probably for the better.
After a sold out crowd of somewhat unprepared locals and die hard fans waded their way in (after a distinctly impressive long wait for most of the latter), London trio Happyness were onstage for support duties. With a combination of drawn out melancholic jams (see ‘Weird Little Birthday Girl’, ‘Pumpkin Noir’) and intense bursts of heavy slacker rock (‘A Whole New Shape’, ‘It’s On You’) the outfit – complete with endearingly awkward appearances and between song banter even more so – conjured up strong sounds lying somewhere between the calm of Pavement and freneticism of Dinosaur Jr. Closing on a short but sweet note with the lyric award winning ‘Montreal Rock Band Somewhere’, Happyness put on a set proving themselves more than worthy of the recent gathered attention, and the kind likely to propell them also to the top of festival slots in years to come.
Following the signature airing of Sex Pistols’ ‘Bodies’ and Rachmaninov’s ‘Piano Concerto No. 2' – a diverse way to prepare the crowd – Suede took to the stage intent on pleasing those more ‘in the know’ with the first hour proving a vastly appreciated cavalcade of B sides, rarities and album cuts. From the off of seldom aired ’93 b side ‘Painted People’, the crowd burst into life and remained that way for the next two hours, racous in appreciation for anything the five piece threw at them. Crashing through the likes of Bloodsports’ ‘Snowblind’, the stomping ‘Heroine’ and the soaring ‘To The Birds’, the outfit showed no signs of withering in their now 26 year long existence, with Brett Anderson launching himself across the stage and into the clutches of the front row at any given moment, and enjoyment evident in the sly grins of every band member briefly lapsing in their expected non-plussed mystique.
Only brief resbite from the somewhat unexpected madness of the quiet seaside town was given when the band aired ‘The Sound Of The Streets’, a track left unplayed for a decade or two and gratituously recieved by the room, alongside two new tracks from their upcoming album, the majestically string fueled ‘Tightrope’ and the premiere of ‘Can’t Give Her What She Wants’, both proving intensely dark ballads of broken romance, and echoing more than a hint of a return to the sombre air of 1994’s ‘Dog Man Star’ LP. Following this, the outfit dove straight into more familiar territory with a collection of gritty guitar fueled hits from ‘Metal Mickey’ to ‘It Starts and Ends With You’ showing no dip in energy, and sending the crowd back into a frenzy of clamouring arms and hoarse voices. After an unavoidable outing of the piano driven escapism of ‘By The Sea’, a triple whammy of Britpop monsters ‘Trash’, ‘Animal Nitrate’ and ‘Beautiful Ones’ proved exactly why Suede ended up such a musical treasure in the first place with even the band tearing about the stage themselves – showcasing some rather impressive moves from bassist Mat Osman- and sending a wave of unadultered delight across the audience as the band left the stage.
However, when you’re Suede simply delighting your fans is evidently not enough, as the encore ensued a mindblowing outing of three 1994 epics – the wistful ‘The 2 of Us’, a goosebump worthy rendition of ‘The Asphalt World’ seeing even the most sternly serious faced guitar duo of Richard Oakes and Neil Codling lose themselves entirely in a fusion of feedback, and finally the euphoric orchestrated beauty of ‘Still Life’, ensuring even the most hardcore fan was left somewhat awestruck by the experience. Suede may have well and truly got over the reunion phase by this point, but their live performances and ever-extending sheer incredible catalogue of music still have unfaltering capability to conjure up joy and shock all those who witness them at every occasion, and with this only a warm up, you can’t help but envy what the John Peel headline set has instore for it, let alone the rest of the band’s career.
http://radsound.co.uk/live-review-suede-25-6-15/

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Re: De La Warr Pavilion - 25/06/15

Post by sunshine » 09 Jul 2015, 22:20

Wednesday 08 July 2015
Sensational Suede rock the pavilion
A few days after an amazing evening revisiting the 90s with Blur at Hyde Park, I was looking forward to continuing riding the wave of 90s nostalgia with Suede at the De La Warr Pavilion (June 25). And they certainly did not disappoint. A loud blast of the Sex Pistols’ expletive-laden abortion rant Bodies woke up sleepy Bexhill before Suede stepped out on to the stage to a raptuous welcome. Brett Anderson’s dynamism doesn’t appeared to have waivered over the years, with an energetic performance showing he is up there as one of the iconic frontmen of the period alongside the likes of Jarvis, Liam and Damon.
Reaching out to the crowds and swinging his microphone with abandon, the slinky singer quickly whipped the audience up into a frenzy. As well as some b-sides and rarely performed tracks, everyone was ‘shaking their bits to the hits’ such as the Beautiful Ones and Trash. Suede absolutely ripped the roof off the place, sending the audience home with smiles on their faces and ears ringing. It was an amazing experience to see such a huge band playing such a small town, especially just days before their stonking set at the Glastonbury Festival.
The musical offerings at the De La Warr just keep getting better and better. So...Pulp next? A girl can dream...
http://www.bexhillobserver.net/what-s-o ... -1-6840204

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