Roundhouse 13th Nov 2015

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sunshine
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Roundhouse 13th Nov 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 17:37

I was one of the lucky people who were at the premiere of Night Thoughts... an interesting concept for the first part where we had a screen where the film was projected and at the bottom you could see the band performing.
From our position it was quite hard to look at the screen, so it was easier to concentrate on the music... and we were treated for a 2 for 1 suede!!
I hope this means no more support bands for a while!! Some of them are interesting, but others!!

So we had:
Night Thoughts: When You Are Young, Outsiders, No Tomorrow, Pale Snow, I Don’t Know How To Reach You, What I’m Trying To Tell You, Tightrope, Learning To Be, Like Kids, I Can’t Give Her What She Wants, When You Were Young, The Fur & The Feathers

Suede Live:
Moving, Killing Of A Flashboy, Trash, Animal Nitrate, We Are The Pigs, Heroine, Pantomime Horse, The Living dead, Darkest Days, New Generation, So Young, Metal Mickey, Beautiful Ones
Encores: The Drowners, My Insatiable One, To The Birds

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Re: Roundhouse 13th No 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 17:41

Some pics
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sunshine
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Re: Roundhouse 13th No 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 17:44

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/what-t ... se-review/

Have Suede reinvented the album?
Neil McCormick, MUSIC CRITIC
14 November 2015 • 11:15am
Few fans go to see old bands hoping to hear new songs. “Here’s one from the new album,” is a phrase almost guaranteed to trigger mass exodus towards bars, concession stands and toilets, a peculiarly welcome excuse for everyone to take a breather and reconvene for the hits in a few minutes. But in an astonishingly inventive performance at a packed Roundhouse, Britpop veterans Suede managed to debut the whole of a new, unreleased album and hold 1700 fans transfixed.

They did it by harking back to an earlier, more innocent era of sound and vision, performing as accompanists to their own silent movie. Playing behind a huge screen, Suede projected a film written and directed by rock photographer Roger Sargent, with each narrative element operating as an enclosed promo to a particular song, whilst the whole built up to a dark and dramatic tale of love and despair.

Perhaps because of its origins in the psychedelic pomp of the Sixties, the very concept of a concept albums tends to suggest florid excesses but Suede’s Night Thoughts essayed a grungy, trashy, kitchen-sink tone in keeping with their own origins as council estate aesthetes. Let’s put it this way, I don’t think I have ever seen so much vomiting in a music promo. It is probably not for everyone, involving psychological breakdown, murder and suicide, shot with a kind of Nan Goldin style low-life veracity. But songs and images worked in powerful conjunction, so each threw inner light on the other.

As the film progressed, backlights revealed the band behind the screen, so they became tiny figures in the unfolding narrative, swaying in the waters washing over a drowning man, singer Brett Anderson falling to his knees during the dramatic, despairing I Don’t Know How To Reach You whilst the onscreen protagonist fell apart at the seams. Bands have been using filmic visuals for decades but I have never seen a rock concert staged quite like this. It was a tightly conceived theatrical experience which compelled the audience to engage with unfamiliar material, a series of songs that flowing together to make a harmonious and greater whole. The long player has suffered commercially in the modern era of playlists and single track streaming but this, at least, suggested there are ways albums might evolve to resist such unbundling.

It was a concert of two halves from a band with somewhat schizophrenic instincts. Suede had faded as a commercial power before they broke up in 2003. Since their return in 2010 they have followed a peculiar twin track of live performances geared around bullishly gung-ho nostalgia whilst trying to re-establish recorded credentials as one of Britain’s great lost art rock bands. When the screen came up after an interval, it was for vintage Suede reward patient fans with a committed charge through their greatest hits. All the invention, poise and economy of the first half vanished as the band played fast and loud and Anderson bounced about like a gangly, over-excited Duracell bunny, throwing himself into the audience and demanding they sing along. A middle aged crowd enthusiastically complied, hands aloft in defiance at passing years, reconnecting with the eternal youth that is one of the greatest gifts pop music has to offer. “Here we are, the beautiful ones la-la-la-la-la!” sang the old folks with gusto and conviction.

The second life of a pop band can be one long decline into nostalgic comfort and creative death. Suede, to their credit, are not going gently into that good night.

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Re: Roundhouse 13th No 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 17:50

12 November, 2015
Blue Suede shows at the Roundhouse
Suede are set to return to Camden to play two dates at the Round¬house this weekend
ROISIN GADELRAB
TWO years ago we were among the fortunate ones to witness Suede’s comeback in the petite upstairs room at Camden Barfly as the band played a set as visceral as if they had never been away.
They did similar in Kenwood a month later but this time to a much more sombre, middle-aged crowd, carrying their earphoned-up kids on their shoulders and enjoying delicate vin, pain et Boursin picnics. It was hardly rock ’n’ roll but we liked it. At that time they were promoting album Bloodsports – critically acclaimed, progressive, but close enough to the band’s roots to satisfy the old-school fan.
Tomorrow (Friday) and Saturday, the band – the winners of this year’s NME Godlike Genius Award – return to Camden to play two nights at the Roundhouse, premiering new album Night Thoughts, played in order in its entirety, against a backdrop of acclaimed music photog¬rapher Roger Sargent’s accompanying film screened behind them, another debut. It will be followed by a set of hits, album tracks and B-sides.
Camden was ever-present in Suede’s formative years. Bassist Mat Osman told Grooves: “When Suede started, the Camden music scene was the centre of our musical universe. The idea was to work your way up through the tight spiral of venues that clustered around the tube. Start at the Falcon, then the Bull and Gate, work your way up to the Underworld, then fill the Electric Ballroom before you made it as far as the Town & Country Club. You could literally go from playing to five men and a dog – which we did, many times, notably an ill-fated ‘Christmas gig’ – to a proper, 2,000-people-singing-along-to-every-line headline slot without ever leaving the Camden postcode.
“We’ve played the Roundhouse once before, back before it was refurbished and was basically a freezing cold shed with holes in the roof. The soundcheck in particular was so Arctic that Neil Tennant, who came on to do a couple of songs with us, did his whole rehearsal in coat, scarf and gloves. I’ve been back many times and it’s such an unusual, striking venue that it always seems to add a little edge to any perfor¬mance you see there.”
Night Thoughts, which is out on January 22, features a full string section, and was produced by long-time Suede collaborator Ed Buller. The album will be available as CD, CD+DVD, special edition CD/DVD hardback book set and 180g double gatefold LP (including a download code).
It will require a leap of faith from listeners, as Mat explains: “The idea for the gigs came about from a desire to present the new album as a whole; as something you’d sit down to listen to for 47 minutes without getting up to make a cup of tea or check your Instagram. The film we’re showing is another side of that – it’s supposed to be the antithesis of a modern music video – it’s slow, complex and thoughtful.”
Sargent, who recently directed the video for The Libertines single Heart of the Matter, said of this latest film: “Suede and I have crossed paths a few times over the years. I sneaked onstage for their ’93 Glastonbury show to get photos for NME. More recently I was asked directly to do some of the photography for the last album.”
He added: “I was asked to pitch an idea for this film project. I really had no idea what they were wanting or expecting so I tried to write in the least self-conscious way poss¬ible. The record deals with a lot of familial themes – life, death, love, anguish and despair; themes that are expanded upon in its visual com-panion, providing a study of how those elements affect the human psyche. It resonated with me for many reasons, not least because my mother passed away a few days after I started writing a story for the film. The film starts with a man drowning in the waters of a deserted beach at night. As he fights for life, his mind plays out the events that led him to be there.”
The video for new track Outsiders features slow-motion visuals taken from the film.
Those who miss out on this week’s shows will have another chance to see Suede when they reprise the show in February, but will have to travel to Glasgow, Manchester or Dublin.

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Re: Roundhouse 13th No 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 17:54

Live: Suede @ Roundhouse
By Kalpesh Patel -
November 15, 2015
“Let’s have it!” yelled Brett Anderson at the Roundhouse crowd before Suede transitioned into 1996 album Coming Up’s hit single Trash, the North London crowd erupting into a frenzy at the opening bars. But that came well into the evening’s events …
The London-based alternative rockers have been known over the past 25 years as a group who innovate, struggle to find their place, collapse, reform, elevate and have ultimately become a band that will always have a true rock and roll backstory.
And so with their seventh studio album Night Thoughts due to be released in January, they decided to innovate once more, reaching out to NME photographer and filmmaker Roger Sargent to write and direct an accompanying film. With the record dealing with familial themes including life, death, love, anguish and despair, he went about creating a visual companion to the music, expanding on these themes.
When Suede announced two shows in November at Camden’s Roundhouse venue that would serve as both a premiere for the film as well as front-to-back outings of the as yet unreleased album, it made for an interesting proposition.
The night was split into two acts: Night Thoughts Spectacular, which had the band playing their seventh record in its entirety as a musical accompaniment behind a screen onto which Roger Sargent’s silent film was projected, and Hits and Treats with the clue to the content in the name, the two divided by a short interval.
The first act was a rather sombre affair with frontman Brett Anderson, guitarist Richard Oakes, bass player Mat Osman, drummer Simon Gilbert and keyboardist Neil Codling playing Night Thoughts without introduction or comment shrouded in darkness, accompanying the film, with Anderson and Oakes lit up sporadically and visible through the screen.
The film, while digressing to an upbeat, stylised video in the middle of set, primarily focused on a small family of a man, woman and young boy, with each song accompanying a discreet narrative. Beginning with the man of the family caught in an ocean, the film rewound and charted the course of the couple’s relationship as they dealt with love, loss and ultimate despair.
As an audience member, it was hard to focus on the music because of the dramatic themes depicted on the massive screen across the front of the Roundhouse stage, but it is safe to say that Night Thoughts is a thought-provoking long player and it is meant to be experienced as such.
Following the interval, the band returned to the screen-less stage with frontman Brett Anderson bathed in light kicking off act two with eponymous debut album track Moving before moving into fan favourite B-side Killing Of A Flash Boy, the 48-year-old frontman bounding about the Roundhouse stage, often perching on monitors to leer out at the crowd.
“Let’s have it!” he yelled at the Roundhouse crowd before transitioning into 1996 album Coming Up’s hit single Trash, the North London crowd erupting into a frenzy at the opening bars.
The pace was kept up as the London rockers tore into 1993 hit Animal Nitrate, the flamboyant frontman dropping to his knees frequently and pogo-ing around the stage, enticing the crowd to reciprocate.
The main set continued with Dog Man Star tracks We Are The Pigs, Heroine, The Living Dead and New Generation before the enigmatic Anderson stuffed his microphone into his back pocket, stood on his monitors and motioned the crowd to clap along as the band erupted into debut album track Metal Mickey.
While engaging with the crowd frequently and spending time singing from the barrier and, at one point, from within the crowd, Anderson said very little as the band jumped from song to song. “It’s been lovely” he said before muttering “last one”, the Roundhouse crowd stomping the former railway turntable engine shed floor as Oakes ripped into the opening guitar riff of Coming Up hit Beautiful Ones.
“We’ll do another couple, stay there” Sussex-born Anderson said to his crowd before the band departed only to return moments later for their encore.
We started with the newest thing we’ve done” the frontman said of their Night Thoughts play-through, “so let’s play the oldest”, introducing the band’s first single The Drowners.
Being tarnished with the “britpop” brush was detrimental to Suede’s goals and had always frustrated Brett Anderson, even though their 1996 album Coming Up was up there with Blur’s Parklife and Oasis’ Morning Glory as the mainstay of many an indie club of the era. Elastica frontwoman Justine Frischmann was even a founding member of Suede. But their latest recorded effort proves that, despite everything, this band were in it for the long haul from the start, driven by producing strong albums rather than charting singles. And their live show is also one to be devoured, with performances of classic hits and brand new material equally engaging.
Night Thoughts is released on January 22nd and is immediately followed up with a European tour before the band head back to UK and Irish shores for shows in Glasgow, Manchester and Dublin in February.

http://rockshot.co.uk/dir/17558/live-suede-roundhouse/

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Re: Roundhouse 13th No 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 17:57

14th November 2015
Suede at the Roundhouse
Alexa Corona
Topping the UK charts throughout the 90s, Suede have a strong history as one of the UK’s top performing alternative rock bands. Winning numerous awards across their careers, in 2013 the band announced the upcoming release of their seventh studio album, Night Thoughts. Set for publication in late January 2016, we are invited to the album’s global premiere at London’s Roundhouse.
From the set up, it’s immediately obvious this is no ordinary show. A dark cinema screen sits on stage and the crowd waits in hushed tones for the band’s arrival. There is not a mobile phone in sight. Suddenly the music flares and the previously ominous screen is brought to life with the images of a man drowning at sea. Lights behind the screen illuminate frontman Bret Anderson as he delivers the poignant words of the album’s first song When You Are Young.
Night Thoughts is an album with a unique twist. Set against the performance’s backdrop is a feature film directed by critically acclaimed photographer Roger Sargent. The film acts as an accompaniment to the music, visually presenting the themes tackled by the record. Impressively the songs are played back to back as the film progresses through its powerful story of a man struggling to deal with the deaths of his son and wife, choosing in the end to commit suicide rather than live with the pain.
It’s an odd experience for a concert; the crowd are relatively subdued and almost no cheering takes place, but by no means is it a negative one. The sound is fantastic and as the tale of love and anguish is woven before you, it’s hard not to become engrossed. Perhaps the only difficulty is splitting your concentration between Anderson’s performance behind screen and what is taking place on it. At times the editing can be a little too choppy that it does become difficult to understand what is occurring, or where your eyes should be drawn.
The second half of the show returns to a more traditional setting as Anderson belts a selection of Suede’s back catalogue. The mobile phones return and the cheering escalates with well-known hits Animal Nitrate and Killing of a Flashboy. It’s a winning combination of the singer’s powerful voice and Richard Oakes’ phenomenal guitar work. Anderson makes an excellent frontman throughout, jumping on top of speakers and down into the crowd – all without missing a beat. For new and old fans, Suede’s performance leaves you not only satisfied, but lost in thought from the emotions expressed.
Verdict: 4/5
http://www.theupcoming.co.uk/2015/11/14 ... ve-review/

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Re: Roundhouse 13th No 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 17:59

14th November 2015
Suede showcase new film during special London performance
Jenn Five /NME
Suede played a unique show at London's Roundhouse on Friday night (November 13) where they performed their entire new album ‘Night Thoughts’ in full from behind a screen showing an accompanying film, proceeding to finish a second set by playing all of their debut EP.
The show, split into two sets, also included rare outings for fan favourite ‘The Living Dead’ and recent B-side ‘Darkest Days’.
Opening with a full run-through of ‘Night Thoughts’, the band took to a stage fronted by a translucent screen showing a 50-minute film directed by NME photographer Roger Sargent, which mirrored the atmosphere of the tracks. Grandiose opener ‘When You Are Young’ was accompanied by visuals of a man walking into the sea and ‘No Tomorrow’ was illustrated by an old man’s attempted suicide. The film developed into time-jumping scenes from the lead character’s breakdown, including kidnapping his ex-girlfriend during ‘I Don’t Know How To Reach You’, but had lighter moments during more upbeat songs such as ‘Like Kids’, ‘Outsiders’ and ‘What I’m Trying To Tell You’ as the man set up a karaoke session in his girlfriend’s garden or slumped naked in a party scene.
At key moments during the film the band members were lit so as to be visible through the screen, but it was only when the screen was removed for the evening’s second set of hits and rarities that the band took centre stage. With singer Brett Anderson characteristically energetic, the band opened the set with ‘Moving’ and their most popular b-side ‘Killing Of A Flash Boy’, then powered through major hits including ‘Trash’, ‘Animal Nitrate’ and ‘We Are The Pigs’ with Anderson shouting “I can’t hear you! Louder!”
Highlights included rare performances of ‘Pantomime Horse’ from their debut album and ‘Stay Together’ B-side ‘The Living Dead’, which Anderson sang parts of unamplified. At the end of the first live outing for ‘For The Strangers’ B-side ‘Darkest Days’ Brett said “that was a surprise, who knew that one?” The hour-long second set closed with Brett declaring “it’s been lovely, before we die of exhaustion here’s the last one” ahead of a crowd-uniting ‘Beautiful Ones’.
The band then returned for an encore with Anderson promising “we started the night with our newest thing we’ve given you, now we’re going to play the oldest.” The band then performed their debut EP in its entirety, including ‘The Drowners’, ‘My Insatiable One’ and ‘To The Birds’.
Suede play the Roundhouse again on Saturday night (November 14).

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Re: Roundhouse 13th Nov 2015

Post by sunshine » 15 Nov 2015, 18:25

LIVE REVIEW: Suede premiere Night Thoughts album & film
WORTH A LOOK?: *****
WHERE: Camden Roundhouse
WHEN: 13/11, also playing 14/11
SETLIST: When You Are Young; Outsiders; No Tomorrow; Pale Snow; I Don’t Know How To Reach You; What I’m Trying To Tell You; Tightrope; Learning To Be; Like Kids; I Can’t Give Her What She Wants; When You Were Young; The Fur and the Feathers.
HITS AND TREATS SET: Moving; Killing Of A Flashboy; Trash; Animal Nitrate; We Are The Pigs; Heroine; Pantomime Horse; The Living Dead; Darkest Days; New Generation; So Young; Metal Mickey; Beautiful Ones; The Drowners; My Insatiable One; To The Birds.
We’re imagining the meeting at Suede HQ in response to the unanimously positive reaction to 2013 comeback album Bloodsports, the band’s first long-player for 11 years: ‘What would Kate Bush do next?’
Tonight the band premieres the 12-strong Night Thoughts album (out 22/1/16) behind a screen as the 45-minute film accompanying it is projected onto it. The clever lighting means we can occasionally see the band at work behind the screen.
We’re asked by a fellow fan whether we think it’s pretentious. It’s certainly not the folly of the Pet Shop Boys playing their Battleship Potemkin soundtrack behind a curtain as the silent film was screened in Trafalgar Square in 2004.
To these ears Night Thoughts sounds very much the natural progression to Dog Man Star. It’s almost as if Bernard Butler were back aboard although we didn’t spot any writing credits from him as the film finished. (Although perhaps that’s because we’re hearing it as one whole piece, rather than 12 potential singles.) The next obvious single is Like Kids (with its ‘la, la, la’ refrain recalling Beautiful Ones) while the images from the film evoke drowning, overdosing, abortion and violence.
There’s even a cheeky skit featuring what appeared to be the naked man from the Dog Man Star cover pixellated and becoming increasingly frenetic as the action played out before him.
What Kate Bush wouldn’t have done of course would be to headline the gig with a hits and treats set providing the fans with the material they most wanted to hear. Suede rattle through the best of their back catalogue with little explanation as the Roundhouse goes wild.
Brett does preface the final three songs explaining that the evening began with their newest work and will close with their oldest.
The perfect blend of experimentation, ambition – and giving your audience what it wants.
http://monstagigz.com/2015/11/14/live-r ... lbum-film/

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