16/04/19 - Blackburn King Georges

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sunshine
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Posts: 7525
Joined: 14 Feb 2002, 01:00

16/04/19 - Blackburn King Georges

Post by sunshine » 17 Apr 2019, 05:42

They played: As One, She, Outsiders, We Are the Pigs, So Young, Metal Mickey,Heroine, Tides, Can't Give Her What She Wants, He is Dead (instead of Float Away), Drowners, Starts and Ends, Manipulation, Filmstar, Trash, Animal Nitrate, God's Gift/Power (Acoustic), All The Wild Places, Invisibles, Flytipping
Encores: Beautiful Ones, Life is Golden

sunshine
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Posts: 7525
Joined: 14 Feb 2002, 01:00

Re: 16/04/19 - Blackburn King Georges

Post by sunshine » 18 Apr 2019, 05:38

17th April
REVIEW: Suede, King George's Hall, Blackburn
By John Anson  @LT_Features
IT must have been a rollercoaster of a ride being part of Suede over the years.
From media darlings to musical pariahs, the band have been loved and loathed in equal measure since they first burst on to the scene as the trailblazers for Britpop in the early Nineties.
Having reformed in 2010, the band returned older, wiser and seemingly determined to prove that all that initial hype was not misplaced.
Fast forward to a Tuesday night in Blackburn and they left an audience in no doubt whatsoever that Suede are very much a living, thriving and finely-tuned band - and they are mightily impressive at what they do.
Lead singer Brett Anderson - dressed all in black, naturally - is a charismatic frontman. He preened, he posed and basically had the audience eating out of the palm of his hand.
At times he was Bowie-esque both in delivery and manner standing on top of his monitors or kneeling on the stage as though summoning the energy to take him to the next level.
There were several forays into the crowd giving his soundman nightmares as his microphone cable threatened to disappear into the delirious mob welcoming their own messiah into the midst.
"Someone touched my bottom," he quipped, as he returned from one excursion.
This was a driving, powerful and compelling show featuring songs from both eras of Suede.
Early hits including So Young, Animal Nitrate and Film Star were rapturously received and offerings from the most recent album, The Blue Hour, were both compelling and relevant.
With long-term band members Mat Osman on bass, drummer Simon Gilbert and guitarist Richard Oakes providing a rock solid, shimmering wall of sound, Anderson was left free to unleash what it is still a remarkable voice.
Credit too to the sound guys who kept the vocals high up in the mix; at times it was chilling, at others enthralling.
Highlights included a version of I Can't Give Her What She Wants from 2016's Night Wish album with Anderson prone on the stage with Oakes providing a sparse backing on guitar, the rest of the band having left them to create a magical moment.
After getting the place jumping with Animal Nitrate, Anderson picked up an acoustic guitar and delivered a moving acapella version of God's Gift leading into The Power. "You'll have to be quiet. I've no microphone for this," he said. You could have heard a pin drop.
An encore of Beautiful Ones and Life is Golden brought a memorable night in Blackburn to a close with Anderson standing on a monitor soaking up the adulation. It was well deserved.
https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/n ... -6caLosBz0

sunshine
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Posts: 7525
Joined: 14 Feb 2002, 01:00

Re: 16/04/19 - Blackburn King Georges

Post by sunshine » 18 Apr 2019, 05:58

11th April
Being on stage with Suede is life-affirming says Brett Anderson
By John Anson
IT is more than 20 years since Suede last played in Blackburn and a lot has changed in that time.
Next week Brett Anderson will take to the stage at King George’s Hall as the band - which many credit with being the catalyst for the Britpop movement - continue to enjoy a sort of second coming.
The darlings of the music press in the early Nineties, Suede were dubbed ‘best band in the world’ by Melody Maker who put them on the cover before they had even released a record.
Their debut album and follow-up Dog Man Star seemed to cement their place at the forefront of the British music scene with Anderson a charismatic and mysterious figure.
By 2003 Suede had split following a series of less well-received releases and obscurity beckoned. But fast forward to 2010 and Suede returned with a new energy and last year they released, The Blue Hour, their third album having reformed.
Tuesday’s show in Blackburn will be only the second date of their latest UK tour and Brett Anderson can’t wait.
“I love playing live,” he said. “I assumed that as I got older (he’s now 51) I’d almost withdraw from playing live but quite the opposite has happened.
“I kind of feel as though the band is much more vital and exciting live than we ever were in the Nineties and that’s a very exciting place to be in.
“Honestly, I relish that hour and a half on stage – it’s life affirming.”
Brett believes that, in a sense, the band have been given a second chance and that this time round they are in a much better position to enjoy the experience.
“We struggled very hard for three years before we achieved any success,” he said. “But when you’re young and you finally do achieve success there is a sense that it’s always going to be like this.
“A career has so many ups and downs - it’s a journey. You go into dark places and go into light places – it’s like a microcosm of a life.
“As you get older you do learn to enjoy the things that sometimes in your youth you took for granted.
“You have to evolve as a person and an artist and that’s what has been so incredibly exciting abut this phase of our career.
"We have been lucky enough to have got another go at it. We split up in 2003 and I think it’s fair to say it wasn’t particularly mourned by the record buying public.
“We finished on a bit of a bum note with the last album (A New Morning) so there was a sense of anti-climax because we didn’t go out on a high.”
When the band got back together in 2010 Brett believes they all had some unfinished business as a result.
“I think reforming and making the last three albums was very much a sense of us of trying to right the wrongs which were very much self-inflicted,” he said.
As well as producing new albums and touring, Brett has also published the memoir Coal Black Mornings about this early life and the initial days of Suede.
“I’m always writing,” he said, “if it’s not music, it’s books. In winter it’s my way of hibernating. I’m at my happiest when I’m working.”
With a major UK tour ahead, Brett is clearly energised by the prospect.
I feel very inspired at the moment as an artist,” he said. “It feels as if the bit is very much between our teeth.”
A Suede live show is always an interesting experience
“We’re very conscious that we have got such rich back catalogue so we try and reflect it all,” he said.
“Obviously we will play songs from the new album because they seem the most relevant to us. On the last tour we tried to play a song we’d never played before every night but I don’t think we’ve got any more of them left.
“But I do think you have got to try and surprise your audience.
“I can’t really understand bands playing same set in same order and how they do that and stay excited about what they are doing. We have to do something that’s a bit more unusual or unexpected which makes us a bit more present I suppose.”
Brett revealed that the second part of his memoirs will be published later in the year and that he is already working on a follow-up to The Blue Hour.
“I don’t know where that’s going but that’s part of the thrill of it really,” he said.
Suede, King George’s Hall, Blackburn, Tuesday, April 16. Details from 0844 847 1664 or www.kinggeorgeshall.com
https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/n ... 1KIirgcrJw

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